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Northwest SARCon Session Descriptions

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NOTE: Field-exercise departure times may be earlier than the start time noted in the brochure and online -- verify your field-exercise departure time and meeting location, posted at conference registration.


Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016

Meet and Greet
5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
For details, see the SARCon Conference Notebook.


 

Friday, Sept. 23, 2016

Scott C. Hammond, PhDKeynote:
Building a Highly Effective and Reliable SAR Team 
Scott Hammond
Dr. Hammond will show six things you can do to turn your SAR group into a Highly Effective and Reliable Team (HEART).  HEART SAR means focusing on team skills and building trust in high-stress situations.  His presentation is based on ten years of research with first responders and his own work as a SAR volunteer. Scott C. Hammond is a Professor of Management in the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University and author of Lessons of the Lost: Finding Hope and Resilience in Work, Life, and the Wilderness. This presentation is highly interactive and involves personal and team assessment.

SAR Management

1A
Understanding Lost Person Behavior using the LPB
Craig McClure
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
This presentation covers understanding -- and then using -- lost-person behavioral profiles for search planning. It will cover how to extrapolate useful planning information from the vast data available in Lost Person Behavior. The participant will learn important background information, implications for search and rescue, search statistics, behavioral statistics, and how to plan a search for a given subject type. Participants will also have the opportunity to work several practical scenarios.

2A

ICS for Search Management
Tim Chase
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
In this 90-minute session, students will learn about ways to better implement and utilize the ICS system in small-scale missions. Through an interactive discussion and review of the Field Operations Guide for SAR, this class will help the student identify ways to increase efficiency and manage searches more effectively.

3A
Locating Remains in Rivers
Tom Evans
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
It is sometimes necessary to search for human remains in river systems -- whether from accidental drowning, homicide, industrial accident, or suicide. Frequently SAR volunteers are tasked with searching for human remains, and incident managers tasked with coordinating volunteer efforts. These personnel could use an understanding of how bones, body parts, and bodies behave when in rivers, and where they are preferentially deposited, to improve search efficiency and success. This interactive lesson will discuss basic river processes, followed by a review of the literature related to the transport of remains in rivers. It will culminate in depictions of the author’s 15 years of field work seeding bones in rivers and tracking where they were deposited over space and time. Rules of thumb for where remains can be found will be presented based on research data, and then a series of interactive case studies will be presented. This will be highly interactive and participatory -- so attendees should expect to take notes and apply the information taught during case studies.


Wilderness

Rescue3 Technical Rope Rescue: Operations-Level (TRR:OL) Course
Marcel Rodriguez
8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m.
This three-day course -- based upon NFPA Standard 1006 -- provides students with the fundamentals of rope rescue in the low-angle environment. Students will learn and practice the following skills: preplanning and size-up of rope rescue operations, knots, anchor systems, belay operations, ascending and descending lines, mechanical advantage systems, patient packaging and litter attending. Students will learn how to safely navigate low-angle or over-the-bank rescue situations and assist rescuers in high-angle environments. Students who successfully complete this course will receive a certification card from Rescue3 International. Students must be at least 18 years old.
PPE Required: Climbing harness, climbing helmet, boots, gloves, eye protection, long pants.
Class Size/Additional Fee: Class size limited to 12. Due to class size limits, attendance will be limited to two members of an agency/team, with additional members put on the wait list. The fee for this course is $190 to cover the cost of participant materials. The general conference fee is in addition to the fee for this course.

1B
Iceland’s Highland Patrol
Haraldur Haraldsson
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Every year, over 1 million tourists descend on the island nation of Iceland (population 330,000). Most will, at some point in their trip, head out to Iceland’s beautiful and remote Highlands. With no permanent infrastructure or services, tourists can quickly fall victim to a host of hazards. To help mitigate this problem, Iceland’s 90+ SAR teams each take responsibility for a section of the Highlands for one week during the tourist season -- moving their team to a forward base and providing all emergency services in that section. In this session, members of BJ Sudurnes will share the details and stories of the Highland Patrol.

1Ba (Classroom/Field Exercise)
Visual Mantracking
Fernando Moreira
11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
In this classroom and field exercise session, Fernando well be covering step-by-step tracking, tracking reports, basics on sign-cutting, night-tracking, and basics in crime-scene tracking investigations. There will be one-hour in the classroom and two hours in the field. Please bring a lunch or purchase one on-site before going into the field.

2B (Classroom/Field Exercise)
GPS Land Navigation
Blake Miller
1:30 – 5:00 p.m.
In this hands-on, real-time button-pushing class, students will learn the basic operating features of handheld GPS receivers. The classroom focus is placed on the practical aspects of the GPS System and how to properly set up individual units for field operations. The class discusses common mistakes and lessons learned from different experiences in the backcountry. The practical field exercise combines key features of the GPS receiver to successfully navigate, mark waypoints, and use the track log. Additionally, the field exercise demonstrates the critical need to correlate both the GPS unit with a map and compass. Tabletop and field exercises are linked to topographic maps and associated grid system. 
Gear: Students must bring their personal GPS receiver for this class.

2Ba
Animal Rescue for SAR teams
OHSTAR
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
In this field exercise, the Oregon Humane Society Technical Animal Rescue (OHSTAR) team will demonstrate how to approach a scared/injured animal, explain dog body language, and emphasize dog safety and handling. The team will instruct students how to make a hasty harness for dogs and a high-angle setup using the gear any SAR team would already have on-hand. No PPE or gear required. This classroom session will be followed by a field exercise (FE-3B) from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.


3B
The 24-Hour Pack
Maxwell Malinow
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
This course will go over the concept of the 24-hour pack that is used within the Pacific Northwest Search and Rescue team. The course will go over the concepts of the pack, along with the pros/cons of specific pack types. General gear will be discussed along with more unique team-specific items.


FE-3Ba (Field Exercise)
Animal Rescue for SAR teams
OHSTAR
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
See session 2Ba for description.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) required: helmet, harness, gloves, and eye protection.  Okay to just watch without PPE.

Technology

1C
Media: Friend or Foe?
Brian Jensen
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
This course will help you build a positive relationship with the media during search and rescue calls. Topics will include establishing a media location on searches, organizing press conferences and updates for the media, utilizing the resources of the media to help you on your searches, and preparing press releases that effectively communicate what is occurring on the search. This course will also cover some of the pitfalls to be aware of when dealing with the media -- including things not to say -- and how to maintain your poise when being interviewed.

FE-2C

Hands-on with Garmin GPS Devices
Bill Loud
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
In this session, participants will have hands-on time with Garmin GPS devices under field conditions. Bring your own GPS or use a provided unit. Learn how to optimize accuracy and how manage Tracklogs and Waypoints. Get hands-on experience with advanced features like Sight 'N Go, Area Calculation, Data Field customization, Profiles and Wireless Sharing. Class is limited to 8 participants. This session will be repeated from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. on Friday.


FE-3C (Field Exercise)
Hands-on with Garmin GPS Devices (Repeat)
Bill Loud
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
See session FE-2C for description.

3C
Introduction to Digital Mobile Radio DMR
Loren Flindt
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Craft House
In this session, Flindt will introduce participants to digital mobile radio and discuss its applications for search and rescue.  Audio demonstrations will be presented.

Medical

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (1D) Part 1 of 2
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (2D) Part 2 of 2
Patient Assessment in a SAR Environment
Kerry Noland
Medical assessment in a wilderness emergency is an absolutely critical -- yet often underperformed -- part of a rescue. This popular session has been extended into two parts this year to ensure that students get a good base of knowledge to use in the later medical scenarios. Geared toward the volunteer rescuer or BLS provider, the session covers how to perform a basic medical assessment; determine how mentally intact a patient is; and ask the right questions. In addition, effective communication with a patient will be taught -- as well as triage systems for multiple patients and how to communicate your findings with medical professionals. This session is eligible for continuing-education credit.

3D
Rescuer Resiliency and Self-Care
Joseph Rabinowitz
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. 
Before taking care of an injured person in the backcountry, you have to take care of yourself first. You need to know what to eat and drink and how often, how to stay warm and dry, what to pack for you and your patient, and how to avoid injury. Learn these things and you will keep from becoming a patient yourself.  Examples of gear -- including a basic medical kit and the AMR Reach and Treat kit -- will be included.


K9

K9 Trailing Course
Luke Tessner, Johnnie Walter and Bill Carr
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Spanning the entire three-day conference, this extended course provides hands-on immersion in the techniques of training the scent-specific trailing dog. This is a field-based training opportunity to build K9 teams that are training for operational success. Trails and skills are built from the experiences and actual casework of our diverse instructor staff. The techniques are offered in an open atmosphere to promote education with a heavy emphasis on operational safety. Attendees will cover all aspects of component training -- from collection and introduction of scent, scent theory, reading canine body language, and reward. Scenario and exposure-based training will also be offered. This course is designed for dogs and handlers of all skill levels.
Size: Space is limited to 19 handlers and their K9 partners.
Gear: Handlers will need to bring a leash, trailing line, harness, treats and a toy for their K9.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.

Cadaver Dog Training Course
Edwin Grant, Colin Thielen and Dr. Lisa Briggs
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Over three days, the dogs will be evaluated by levels of training and indications. Dogs will be evaluated on a large and small source. Dogs and handlers will be assigned to beginner, intermediate and advanced groups. Dogs will be worked on and/or introduced to large source of human material. Dogs worked on larger sources will be dependent on ability and levels of training. Search locations will include open woods, fields, buildings and vehicles.
Dogs will also be evaluated on beginning water work and advanced on ability and experience. Handlers will be instructed on proper search techniques on water -- from the beginning of a water search until the recovery. Boating search patterns will be a priority, along with the proper use of K9s on a water search and the use of handheld GPS. At the end of the weekend, handlers will be given the opportunity to work large sources on land and or boat. The handlers will be given the opportunity to certify for cadaver, land or water through Objective First Tactical K9.
Size: This course is limited to 16 handlers and their K9 partners.
Gear: Handlers will need to bring lifejackets for water training and any other equipment needed for water training for your K9.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.

Wilderness Air Scent Non-Discriminatory
Tim Brown and Ian Gilbert-Ghormley
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
"Wilderness Air Scent" is an introduction to air-scent K9 training for beginning to intermediate dog teams. The goal of this course is to familiarize new and intermediate handlers with the basic aspects of K9 training and search technique. Topics to be covered include: run-aways, rewards, alerts, scent theory, planning to work a search area, utilizing support, and leading teams on searches. Attendees will also learn to troubleshoot training problems.
The class is also open to a limited number of people who want to learn how to act as support for K9 teams and for hiding subjects.
Dogs should have strong obedience and be able to work off-lead.
Training will be customized to each handler and the K-9 based on experience to maximize return for your time.
Size: Class is limited to 8 handlers and their K9 partners.
Gear: There will be training in different physical environments, so be sure to bring your full search backpack. Full field gear is required. Vaccinations should be current.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.

K9 Airscent Night Exercise
Tim Brown and Ian Gilbert-Ghormley
7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
 

Enhanced SAR

1F
ATV Accidents: Prevention and First Response
Jeff Salzer
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this session, Salzer will highlight ATV accidents -- focusing on the high numbers, types and seriousness of the injuries; first response in the field as an ATV rider; and the best way to prevent and minimize these accidents from happening.

1Fa
4WD Basic
Ken Boell , Karl Ritchey, Chad Schroll and Dan Griffin
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this beginner classroom course, Boell, Ritchey, Schroll and Griffin -- with their combined experience with off-road vehicles -- will discuss 4WD misconceptions, review basic 4WD equipment and capabilities, and list and discuss basic gear needed for 4WD search operations and vehicle communications. This classroom session will be followed by a field exercise (FE-2Fa) from 1:30 – 5:00 p.m.

FE-2F (Field Exercise)
ASI ATV Safety Course
Justin Dersham
1:30 – 5:00 p.m.
The ATV rider course is designed to teach students the safety procedures and riding principles needed to ensure a rider is making safe use of their Class 1 ATV while operating it in the field. This session is limited to 6 participants.
Prerequisites: Riders are encouraged to complete the online rider safety course, and receive their Rider Education Card from the state of Oregon prior to class. This course is available at www.rideatvoregon.com. Successful completion of this course results in an ATV Certification from the ATV Safety Institute. Certification cards will be mailed directly to the students from ASI.
Gear: Participants will need a Class 1 ATV (4-wheeler/non side-by-side,) a DOT approved helmet, full finger gloves, some kind of eye protection (face shield or goggles), boots that cover the ankles, long-sleeve shirt and long pants.

FE-2Fa (Field Exercise)
4WD Basic
Ken Boell, Karl Ritchey, Chad Schroll and Dan Griffin
1:30 – 5:00 p.m.
This field exercise is designed for those just beginning their off-road experiences; attendees will participate in a driving course. Concepts and equipment demonstrated will include: off camber, water bars, suspension flex, brake modulation, obstacle negotiation, hill climb and descent. Confidence-building and self-extraction will be emphasized. This class is limited to 20 vehicles.
Gear: Gloves and rain gear are encouraged.

Water Rescue

2G
Water Rescue and Rope Awareness (Part 1 of 2)
Keith Gillespie
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
In this two-part session, Gillespie introduces personnel to the problems associated with water and rope incidents, as well as the procedures to follow in flash-flood, large-scale disaster, and seasonal-flooding situations. The course is designed to develop knowledge in the areas of:
In order to accomplish the responsibilities of the awareness level responder, the course also provides students with a conceptual understanding of the principles, applications, and hazards associated with advanced water and rope rescue techniques.

3G
Water Rescue and Rope Awareness (Part 2 of 2)
Keith Gillespie
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
See session 2G for description.




Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016




NORTHWEST SARCON BANQUET
Doors open at 5:30 p.m.
Dinner served at 6 p.m.
Entertainment begins at 6:30 p.m.
Cascade Activity Center
Come and celebrate with your friends and colleagues at the annual Northwest SARCon banquet. This catered event will be serving an impressive buffet dinner and a no-host bar. After a relaxing dinner, sit back and enjoy entertainment from Larry Jones. Your name badge will be required to enter the banquet. For those who purchased additional banquet tickets, you may pick up your guest’s badge at the Registration table on the day of the event.



SAR Management

4A
Mapping for SAR Managers (Part 1 of 2)
Tim Chase
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
In this 3-hour course, students will be introduced to a wide variety of mapping tools and resources available for SAR managers in the state. The course will include demonstrations of various electronic mapping programs and an introduction to finding data to make your maps more useful. The class will also cover the best practices for using maps before, during, and after a mission. This will include planning, status tracking and documentation. If students have their own electronic mapping programs, they are encouraged to bring a laptop for practical exercises. This session will continue (5A) from 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

5A
Mapping for SAR Managers (Part 2 of 2)
Tim Chase
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
See session 4A for description.

6A
Hays Case Study and Table Top Exercise (Part 1 of 2)
Deputy John Gibson and Sgt. Sean Collinson
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Deputy Gibson and Sgt. Collinson of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue team will be proctoring this table-top exercise, based on a real SAR mission in Clackamas County in the late 1990s. The exercise deals with a missing mentally-ill subject that involved a multi-day search-and-rescue call, with hundreds of volunteer resources being deployed. Multiple operation periods will be covered, and mapping and segmentation will be required. After working the case, Deputy Gibson and Sgt. Collinson will walk you through the find -- and lessons learned from the real mission. This session will continue (6A) from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

7A
Hays Case Study and Table Top Exercise (Part 2 of 2)
Deputy John Gibson and Sergeant Sean Collinson
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
See session 6A for description.

Wilderness

Rescue3 Technical Rope Rescue: Operations-Level (TRR:OL) Course
Marcel Rodriguez
8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description and PPE.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.

Dual Capability Rope-Rescue Systems
Dave Clarke
9:00 – 10:00 a.m. (4B) Classroom
10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (FE-5B) Field Exercise
This classroom and field session is intended for experienced rope-rescue practitioners. Clarke will explain the differences between dual-capability, two-tensioned, and conventional main and belay rope rescue systems.  In a dual-capability system, each rope serves as both a mainline and a belay line.
After a discussion of recent trends and the pros and cons of each system, we will demonstrate the dual-capability system currently used by Portland Mountain Rescue.  We believe that this system offers significant advantages over our previous techniques.  Attendees will have the opportunity to get hands-on experience with the system.
This demonstration will utilize the CMC MPD and show the latest MPD techniques -- derived from a month of testing conducted this year in British Columbia.  However, MPDs are not necessary to make a dual-capability system. We will discuss the criteria for using other devices in these systems so that teams can take advantage of the benefits of dual capability with the hardware they already own and are familiar with. The field exercise is limited to 16 participants.  The classroom portion of this session is not limited. 

FE-4B (Field Exercise)
Survival Techniques for SAR Personnel
Fernando Moreira
8:30 – 10:30 a.m.
In this field-exercise session, Fernando will cover basic shelters, how to start a fire, gear that you should have in SAR missions, and how to collect water and to be able to survive in all types of weather and conditions.
Gear: Bring 24-hour SAR Pack.

5B
UTM Plotting
Blake Miller
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this session, attendees will learn the essentials of position plotting with this simple navigation coordinate system. UTM is used to identify locations on earth in meters.
Gear: Bring your GPS receiver to pair UTM with topographic map and GPS receiver.


Set-up and Navigate Search Grids with GPS
Ken Snell and Jerry King
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (6B) Classroom
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.  (FE-7B) Field Exercise
This session is designed for SAR searchers that design Type 2 search patterns for polygons given to them by the local deputy sheriff. The course will review the basic Type 2 search technique that are commonly used in search and rescue. However, this class will expand on the fundamentals -- as well as discuss use of handheld GPS units to lay out patterns to effectively conduct searches. A handheld GPS is required for the class. This session is limited to 15 participants.

6Ba
Small Party Assisted Rescue (SPAR): An Introduction to Rescue Techniques Requiring Minimal Equipment and Personnel
Tom Evans
1:30 – 3:30 p.m.
The vast majority of backcountry accidents take place with few people present -- making that small group of people the best resources for starting or completing simple rescues. Small Party Assisted Rescue (SPAR) is the idea that for most minor injuries, only a small group of people are needed to accomplish, or at least start, a rescue even in rough terrain. In this course we will explore when to use SPAR techniques, what minimal equipment is needed to perform these kinds of rescues, and how to perform raises and lowers with minimal equipment. These techniques can be used by callout rescue teams when initial resources reach a patient, often lacking equipment, and by personnel. Topics covered will include: Simple webbing anchors, simple rope-only anchors, Münter Hitch lowers and belays with common variants, fixed brake lowers, simple haul systems using minimal equipment, inline traveling hauls, counterbalances, convert to lower, contingency rigging, and vector raises.
Gear: No PPE needed -- however, it would be useful, but not required, for attendees to have a couple carabiners, a small personal pulley or two, and one or two rope grabs (prusik loops, Tiblock, Rollnlock, Micro Traxion, Ropeman, etc.), webbing, and a rope.

7B
Balancing Act: Making Life Work When It Matters Most
Trey Doty
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Life balance is more than practicing a few simple techniques. Integrating work and life demand a commitment to understanding your purpose, identity, and relationships as foundational to your emotional and psychological health. In this course, discover ways to navigate the impact of trauma through an intentional approach to your overall well-being.

Technology

4C
Applying Drone Technology to Search and Rescue
Lawrence Dennis, Tim Lawrence and Stephen Burtt
9:00 – 10 a.m.
In this classroom session, members of Aerial Technology International will give an overview of drone technology -- and how it will shape the future of search and rescue.

5C
Technology for Search and Rescue – Features and Limitations
Ron Wright
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
In this session, Wright will demonstrate the technology available for use in outdoor and rescue situations to locate and communicate. GPS, Personal Locator Beacons, EPIRBs, radios, cell phones, and satellite phones will be discussed -- as well as how they differ, what their capabilities are, and what to look for in the future. This session will be repeated (8C) on Sunday from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

FE-5C (Field Exercise)
Applying Drone Technology to Search and Rescue
Lawrence Dennis, Tim Lawrence and Stephen Burtt
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this field session, we will explore different ways that drone technology can be used to assist current and future SAR activities. Attendees will learn the basics of safely deploying a drone in a SAR setting with a focus on flight operations and the utilization of various sensors and payloads. This field exercise will be repeated (FE-9C) Sunday, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

6C
D4H™ DECISIONS Train The Trainer
Robin Blandford
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this session, Blandford will demonstrate “the secret to capturing good data”: D4H™ DECISIONS Records Management Overview and the new D4H™ LIVE Realtime Operations Platform.  This is a basic step-by-step course, suitable for complete beginners. 
Gear: D4H Train the Trainer requires wi-fi and candidates to bring their own laptops.

7C
Introduction to SAR Topo
Matt Jacobs
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
SARTopo is a free, offline-capable mapping solution tailored specifically to search and rescue. Because SARTopo allows everyone -- including field teams -- to work off the same maps and data, it can improve situational awareness and operational efficiency. This session will show how to use SARTopo to quickly visualize terrain, generate 1:24k assignment maps and forms, preload segments to GPS, track field teams, filter and manage tracks, and log clues.
 

Medical

4D
Bleeding and Hemorrhage Control
John Krummenacker and Josh Brown
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
This course will cover the new national standards for bleeding and hemorrhage control as adopted by NAEMT and the Hartford Consensus.  Students will learn out to identify, treat and control both basic and catastrophic bleeding.  Students will get an opportunity to try several methods of bleeding control and have hands on time with various commercially available tourniquet systems.

5D
Chest Trauma Management
John Krummenacker and Josh Brown
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
This class will offer an overview of both penetrating and blunt chest trauma, chest and abdominal anatomy, mechanisms of injury, diagnoses and field treatment. 

6D
Fracture and Dislocation Management for Lost Subjects and Searcher
Garin Duffield
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
This session was developed as a result of so many rescues involving orthopedic injuries -- broken bones, torn ligaments, and dislocations. This session is aimed at giving the volunteer or BLS rescuer the tools to appropriately assess and manage a range of injuries in the wilderness environment. Basic concepts such as spinal immobilization, extremity fractures, dislocations of the shoulder, hip, and patella, and pelvic immobilization will be discussed and treatments demonstrated. Learn to use commercial splints as well as improvising with what you have in your pack. This session is eligible for continuing-education credit.


7D
NW Environmental Injury
Garin Duffield
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Outdoor recreation in the Pacific Northwest often produces a set of common injuries and illness -- chief among which are heat and cold illness, head injuries, poisonings, and anaphylaxis. This is a great session for any hiker, climber, or skier, as well as a rescuer. These topics will be addressed so that anyone can recognize, understand, and treat these commonly seen injury patterns. How can you differentiate a mild from a severe head injury? Come to this session to find out. This session is eligible for continuing-education credit.


K9

K9 Trailing Course
Luke Tessner, Johnnie Walter and Bill Carr
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description.

Cadaver Dog Training Course
Edwin Grant, Colin Thielen and Dr. Lisa Briggs
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description.

Wilderness Air Scent Non-Discriminatory
Ian Gilbert-Ghormley and Tim Brown
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description.

Enhanced SAR

4F
Natural Resource Damages from OHV within the National Forest System Lands
Ross Gamboa and Ryan Bussmus
9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
In this session, USFS Law Enforcement Officer Ross Gamboa will discuss the Federal Regulations with Off Highway Vehicles (OHV) within National Forest System lands.

4Fa
4WD Advanced
Ken Boell, Karl Ritchey, Chad Schroll and Dan Griffin
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
In this advanced session, Boell, Ritchey, Schroll and Griffin will discuss environmental factors affecting 4WD SAR operations -- including mud, snow, ice, sand, rocks and water crossings. They will include vehicle inspection, maintenance and spare parts. Participants will have the opportunity to see a tire-plug demonstration. This session will be followed by a field exercise (FE-5Fa) from 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

5F
ATVs in SAR
Jeff Salzer
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this session, Salzer will be discussing recommended and required equipment for the searcher and ATV, advanced riding techniques, and uses on the ATV on search missions. No equipment needed. This session will be followed by a field exercise (FE-6F) from 1:30 – 5:00 p.m. for those participants who have brought their ATVs.
   
FE-5Fa (Field Exercise)
4WD Advanced
Ken Boell, Karl Ritchey, Chad Schroll and Dan Griffin
11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
In this advanced field exercise, participants will learn how to set tire pressure, and about picking lines and spotting. Advanced recovery, tow points and problem-solving will also be demonstrated and practiced.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.
Gear: Gloves and rain gear are encouraged.
This class is limited to 20 vehicles.

FE-6F (Field Exercise)
ATVs in SAR Field Applications
Jeff Salzer
1:30 – 5:00 p.m.
In this session, Salzer will be putting to use what was discussed it the classroom session. This will be a hands-on demonstration of advanced riding techniques, stuck vehicle extractions, search techniques, and subject transport.
Gear: PPE is required (Approved DOT helmet, eye protection, long sleeve shirt, long pants, and leather gloves) and of course an ATV to use during the class.
This field exercise is limited to 10 participants.

ATV Night Ride
Jeff Salzer
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
This evening course will take place after the banquet for 2-3 hours. We will practice some technical riding skills and search techniques in a nighttime environment. This will be a hands-on demonstration. Class size is limited to 10 riders.

Water Rescue

FE-4G (Field Exercise)
Swift Water Awareness
Adam Tingey and Nate Thompson
8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. 
Many search operations take place near some sort of waterway. It is highly beneficial for the search and rescue professional to have a basic awareness of water safety for themselves and/or search partners and victims. This full day field exercise will cover the basics of specialized equipment, water hydrology, and basic self/partner rescue techniques.
Gear: This course will involve swimming and the navigation of difficult terrain. Specialized equipment such as dry suits, thermals, gloves, PFD, helmet and shoes are required. Students are encouraged to bring their own equipment. 
This field exercise is limited to 10 participants.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.

5G
Changing Weather Patterns for the Northwest
Rod Hill
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this session, local meteorologist and founder of portlandweather.com Rod Hill will highlight the changing seasonal weather patterns a warming climate is bringing to the Northwest.

6G
Dive Rescue Search Patterns
Jerry Richert
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
"Dive Rescue Search Patterns" will cover the so-called "bread and butter" search patterns that are effective, simple and safe to use. This is a great class for new teams, team members or others that may not have a set of go-to search patterns. This classroom session will be followed by a field exercise (FE-7G) from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

FE-7G
Dive Rescue Search Patterns (Field Exercise)
Jerry Richert
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
See session 6G for description.



Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016


SAR Management

8A
Reflex Tasking for the SAR Manager
Craig McClure
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
"Reflex tasking" is the cornerstone of quickly and effectively deploying resources -- implementing a logical search plan in the initial phases of a search. Reflex tasking is an easily repeatable process requiring few planning inputs, and can help you as the search manager or searcher achieve rapid results on a search. Find them, quickly. That's the goal -- and you'll leave this class with new skills to do just that.

9A
Search to Crime Scene: Scene Preservation
Wendi Babst
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
If in the course of a search, evidence emerges that a crime has been committed, search-and-rescue personnel must take appropriate steps to preserve it – increasing the likelihood the case can be successfully investigated and the person responsible brought to justice. Taught by a law-enforcement veteran, this session will give searchers the skills they need to accomplish this goal.

10A
Segmenting for Search Planners (Part 1 of 2)
Corey Stone
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
This class will explore considerations that must be made when creating “searchable segments” for ground teams. Key items will be: natural segment borders, artificial segment borders, man-made segment borders, segment size related to resource capability, segment size and POD for a limited resource, searcher safety, terrain, vegetation, other hazards (snow, ice, and crevasses), and time necessary to search in daylight. Students will be shown examples for actual search maps and given a mathematical reference table for estimating appropriate search areas by resource level. Different tools for estimating land areas will be shown -- including MyTopo Terrain Navigator, which will be demonstrated to show how to determine the land area on any shape segment. Students will have an opportunity to segment on handout maps and discuss choices with the group. This class is limited to 20 students and will continue (11A) from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

11A
Segmenting for Search Planners (Part 2 of 2)
Corey Stone
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
See session 10A for description.

Wilderness

Rescue3 Technical Rope Rescue: Operations-Level (TRR:OL) Course
Marcel Rodriguez
8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description and PPE.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.

8B
Sea Cliff Rescue & Casualty Recovery in the Irish Coast Guard
Robin Blandford
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
The green cliffs of the Irish Coast provide an iconic beauty. They also provide a very unique rescue terrain for the Irish Coast Guard members who respond to numerous cliff rescues every year. Being devoid of natural anchors, the rescue teams have developed and refined techniques for picket-based anchors for high-angle rescues. Join Irish Coast Guard volunteer Robin Blandford as he presents the scenarios faced and the systems used in this challenging environment. This session will include both a lecture and field session (FE-9B).

9B
Size-up, Command, and Control of the Technical Rope Incident
Craig McClure
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this classroom session, learn the best practices to effectively evaluate, communicate, and execute a technical rope incident. We will discuss standard commands, size up protocol, span of control, and effective management practices needed to ensure safety, efficiency, and ultimately success of a technical incident. This class will be helpful to any level of rescuer, and does not require technical rescue knowledge.

FE-9B (Field Exercise)
Picket-Based Anchors for High-Angle Rescue
Robin Blandford
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In a continuation of the session 8B lecture, Blandford will have participants in this field exercise understand the requirements of a picket-based anchor system.  He will demonstrate the ability to rig a picket-based anchor system in poor ground conditions, as well as help attendees understand the limitations of picket-based anchor systems.  Participants will learn to be able to select and care for the equipment of a picket-based anchor system and understand the safety benefits of a Parallel Rope Rescue System. Blandford will demonstrate the ability to lower and haul on a picket-based system, show how to recover an injured climber, and give insight into the decision-making when performing a rescue above the sea.

10B
USAR Response in Haiti
Haraldur Haraldsson and Halldor Halldorsson
1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
The 2010 earthquake in Haiti was an epic disaster, resulting in the deaths of nearly 200,000 people. The Icelandic Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) team was the first team on the ground to assist with the devastation. In this session, two members of that team will discuss their experiences in arriving in Haiti within 24 hours of the event -- as well as the issues and events that followed during their time in-country.

FE-10B
Technical Rope Rescue Mock SAR
Craig McClure
1:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Put the skills and tips learned in the "Size-Up, Command, and Control of the Technical Rope Incident" session to use with real moving rope and consequences! This sesssion will focus on the size-up, leadership, and control of technical rope problems.
Gear: Bring inspected and logged team gear, personal PPE, harness, and a radio capable of operation on SAR Orange.
Pre-registration is required so instructor(s) can plan for gear and appropriate scenarios.

11B
K9 Support for the Type 2 Searcher
Stephen Korpi and Trisha Schulz
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
This is an introductory course intended for Type 2 searchers who do not regularly work with K9 teams and wish to be prepared if called upon to support a wilderness air scent K9 team during a search. Topics will include scent theory, search area planning, benefits and limitations of K9s and support roles.

Technology

8C
Technology for Search and Rescue – Features and Limitations (Repeat)
Ron Wright
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
See session 5C for description.

9C
Terrain Driven Search Management
Matt Jacobs
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
In this session, participants will learn about new research into the effect of terrain on lost person behavior. This presentation will cover the objective research findings and the author’s opinions of their implications on current search management practices, as well as examining how they relate to some real-life search scenarios.

FE-9C
Applying Drone Technology to Search and Rescue (Repeat)
Lawrence Dennis, Tim Lawrence and Stephen Burtt
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
See session FE-5C for description.

10C
Using Metal Detectors in SAR
Bob Mote
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
As the leading countermine supplier to the U.S. military, Minelab now offers cutting-edge technology that improves both evidence-recovery time and courtroom-preparation efficiencies for field investigators. Minelab's solutions are specifically designed for forensic sciences, Homeland Security, federal investigation agencies, police departments, marine law-enforcement dive teams, fire departments and military.
Key solution features:
• Faster evidence-recovery time and improved data-collection efficiency
• Ruggedized design for all-terrain and underwater environments
• Specialized in identifying bullet casings, knives, guns, jewelry, coins and small metal fragments
• Software technology solutions allow teams to collect field data, add supporting notes and images, archive to file, and exchange data to and from the field in real-time

11C
Next Generation 911
Michelle Renault
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Ever wondered how 911 actually works and its involvement in search and rescue? The class will explain how 911 calls are received and what information is provided to the dispatcher. Listen to an actual 911 call for service on a search and rescue. Discuss the differences between large 911 centers and small centers and their actual responsibilities. This session will recommend ideas for working with your own center and discuss training opportunities for both to provide a better response. We will also be going over what is coming next for 911 -- including texting/pics/video.

Medical

8D
Patient Packaging for SAR Missions
Bozeb Beckwith
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
After you have located your subject and determined their injuries, how do you get them safely out if they can’t walk?  This class focuses on how to “package” a person in a litter so they can be safely evacuated. Learn how to use internal lashing, insulation, weatherproofing, and litter rigging to ensure your patient is warm, secure, comfortable, and easily accessible for medical evaluation within a litter. Also covered will be basic use of SKED and Stokes litters, basic knots, and carrying techniques. Application of these techniques will be useful in the medical scenarios that follow. This session is eligible for continuing education credit.

9D
Patient Assessment in the SAR Environment (Part 1 of 2)
Joseph Rabinowitz
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
If you’ve attended the sessions "Fracture and Dislocation Management for Lost Subjects and Searcher," "Patient Packaging for SAR Missions," and "NW Environmental Illness and Injuries," now learn how to actually do what you've been taught.  This field exercise is a great opportunity to get “hands-on” with a variety of medical skills.  Taught by paramedics and in an outside environment, you will triage, assess, treat, splint, package, and communicate -- and end up with more confidence in your medical skills. Have you ever taken a blood pressure, given epinephrine, or tested blood sugar? No? This session will teach the novice these skills -- and will be a great review for those BLS providers working in the wilderness. You do not need to attend any classroom sessions to participate, but it is strongly recommended. Please dress appropriately for the weather.  This session continues from 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.  This session is eligible for continuing education credit.

10D
Patient Assessment in the SAR Environment (Part 2 of 2)
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
See session 9D for description.


K9

K9 Trailing Course
Luke Tessner, Johnnie Walter and Bill Carr
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description.

Cadaver Dog Training Course
Edwin Grant, Colin Thielen and Dr. Lisa Briggs
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description.

Wilderness Air Scent Non-Discriminatory
Ian Gilbert-Ghormley and Tim Brown
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
See Friday, Sept. 23 for session description.

Enhanced SAR

FE-8F
ATV in SAR Advanced Ride
Jeff Salzer
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
We will be traveling to a local OHV park so we can apply what was learned in the previous sessions. This session will allow students to practice their skills in a less controlled/confined environment.
Gear: Full SAR gear will be required for this session to include PPE (Approved DOT helmet, eye protection, long sleeve shirt, long pants, and leather gloves) GPS, and FRS radio and ATV. You will be responsible for transporting your ATV to the riding area.
Limited to 10 students.
Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly.

FE-8Fa
4WD Vehicle Stabilization/Extrication
Ken Boell, Karl Ritchey, Chad Schroll and Dan Griffin
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
In this field exercise, participants will use this scenario based application of learned concepts to stabilize vehicles and allow safe extrication of vehicles, depending on time allowed.
Gear: Lunch is not provided in the field. Please plan accordingly. Gloves and rain gear are encouraged.
This class is limited to 20 vehicles.

Water Rescue

8G
Underwater Crime Scene Investigation (Operations)
Phillip Graf
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
This session is designed to provide an introduction to information to certified Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T) officials, coroners, deputy coroners, certified Medico Legal Investigators (ABMDI), and non-P.O.S.T. members to include search and recovery dive personnel and rescue personnel who may respond to an in-water evidence search or water-related drowning. Evidence search may include items of interest or cadavers.
The purpose of the "Underwater Crime Scene Investigation Operations" program is to provide necessary skills and knowledge in performing underwater crime scene investigations, preservation, and proper documentation for court-ready testimony.

9G
Benefits of Dive Rescue In-House Maintenance
Jerry Richert
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
This session will cover the benefits of doing maintenance and annual servicing yourself. This presentation is good for any team or team member. We discuss the importance of building relationships with your local dive shop while providing you with information on classes you can take to do repairs in-house. Saving time and money is always important, but always brings up the question of accountability! This presentation has always sparked great discussions.

10G
Investigations into the Loss of a Public Safety Diver
Phillip Graf
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
What type of scrutiny can your agency expect after the death of one of your own? What will your agency go through in the event that they lose a diver during training and/or operations? In this session, Graf will discuss the investigations into the loss of a public-safety diver.  



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Northwest SARCon

Sheriff Craig Roberts

Sheriff Craig Roberts

2016 Northwest SARCon
Sept. 23-25, 2016

Camp Kuratli at Trestle Glen
24751 SE Hwy 224
Boring, OR 97009

Julie Collinson, Conference Coordinator
Phone: 503-557-5827
Fax: 503-794-8068
jcollinson@clackamas.us

Register online