Northwest SarCon
Hosted by Clackamas County Sheriff

Session Descriptions

SARCon Session Descriptions

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Field exercise departures times may be earlier than the start time noted in the brochure and online -- verify your field exercise departure time and meeting location posted at conference registration.


Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013

K9

The Tactical Dog Enterprises (TDE) K9 Cadre is honored to have been chosen again to instruct at Northwest SARCon. They will again bring their field proven methodologies and unique approaches to SAR & LE K9 skills. They look forward to seeing new and returning teams.

K9 Trailing
Luis H. Ledbetter, Jenna Mendez
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (1E) (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

Spanning the entire four-day conference, this extended course provides hands-on immersion in the techniques of training the scent-specific trailing dog.
This is a field-based training opportunity to build K9 teams that are training for operational success. Trails and skills are built from the experiences and actual casework of our diverse instructor staff.
The techniques are offered in an open atmosphere to promote education with a heavy emphasis on operational safety.
Attendees will cover all aspects of the trailing dog path from collection and introduction of scent, scent theory, reading canine body language, tactics, flanking and reward. Scenario and exposure-based training will also be offered.
There will be evening PowerPoint presentations to include case reviews and training principles.
This course is designed for dogs and handlers of all skill levels. Space is limited. No toy breeds accepted, please.

Human Remains Detection K9
Edwin Grant and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (2E) (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

Spanning the entire four-day conference, this extended course provides hands-on immersion into the techniques of training the human remains detection dog.
Classroom opportunities for case reviews and clandestine grave recognition will be offered as part of the four-day track.
Field exercises will include both water and land based exercises. Special attention will be given to reading canine body language and developing a solid alert.
Many opportunities will be presented to expose the K9 Team to various types of human remains and special consideration will be given to setting up real world scenarios to challenge the attending teams.
This course is designed for dogs and handlers of all skill levels. Space is limited.

Traditional K9 Air Scent
Colin Baessler and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (3E) (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

Spanning the entire four-day conference, this extended course provides hands-on immersion into the techniques of training the SAR Air Scent dog.
This course will demonstrate a traditional approach to K9 Air Scent with a twist to the instruction that will include exposure to an intensity-based training method. Students will be introduced to concepts based on real world challenges facing SAR K9 teams as it relates to the deployment and location of missing persons.
K9 Teams will be immersed in real world scenarios based on actual successful deployments from the instruction staff.
Classroom opportunities will be offered for case review and discussions. Operational safety will also be covered.
This course is designed for dogs and handlers of all skill levels. Space is limited.


Friday, Oct. 4, 2013

KEYNOTE: Quiet Heroes: Seldom Making Headlines, Always Making a Difference

Award-winning journalist Bob Welch -- who's written books about everything from the Band of Brothers to hiking the 452 miles of Oregon's Pacific Crest Trail -- explains why he's always preferred the difference-makers in the shadows to the glory hogs in the spotlight. The author of 15 books and 2,000 newspaper columns, Welch speaks with heart, humor and hope in reminding audiences that they matter far more than they might know.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Register-Guard columnist Bob Welch has twice been honored by the National Society of Newspaper Columnists as best in the nation, and he's won the "best writing" category in the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association's contest the last two years. He is the author of 15 books, the latest of which include "Cascade Summer: My Adventure on Oregon's Pacific Crest Trail," and "Resolve: From WWII Bataan, the Epic Story of a Soldier, a Flag, and a Promise Kept." A national speaker, Welch has appeared on “Good Morning America” and spoken at the Massachusetts Statehouse. He is an adjunct professor of journalism at the University of Oregon and the founder of the Beachside Writers Workshop.

SAR Management

Death and Decomposition: An Overview of Human Decomposition in the SAR Environment
Kimberly Kelly
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (1A)

There is perhaps no other field that requires its members to perform such difficult work as that of a search and rescue or recovery worker, but at the same time, gives such little support or education to that recovery worker. From recent criminal cases of SAR members interfering with crime scenes, to not finding the subject (who is later located by family or friends within the search area), to searchers developing post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), lack of training or knowledge is a frequent issue. Course attendees will discuss the process of human decomposition in a step-by-step method. After establishing this baseline knowledge, variations of decomposition (incineration, saponification, etc.) will be discussed.

Suspending the Mission
Tygh Thompson
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (2A)

Suspending a search is one of the most difficult decisions that SAR managers must make. There are several questions that must be answered.  This course will present many of the issues that must be examined and a process to be considered when a search is not successful and the decision to suspend the mission must be made.

Conducting Effective Post-Mission Critiques
Tygh Thompson
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (3A)

Each SAR mission presents new challenges and issues.  There is always something to learn once the mission is over. Post mission critiques are the best way to capture the lessons learned from a mission.  For a critique to be meaningful, it must be conducted properly.  This course will explore techniques for conducting internal as well as open public critiques.  Several critique formats will be offered along with tips for those who serve as critique facilitators.

Wilderness

Emergency Shelters and Sheltering
Peter Kummerfeldt
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (1B)

In this session Kummerfeldt will present a broad ranging, self-critiquing quiz that challenges the participant's knowledge and beliefs regarding a wide variety of survival and outdoor safety topics. After the forty-question critique is completed then Kummerfeldt will review each question and insure that the participants have a clear understanding of the issues that were raised.

Basic Knots for Ground Searchers
Al Tong
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (FE-1B) (Field Exercise
)
This session will teach knot theory and knot construction. Tong will focus on a small number of knots that are very useful to ground search volunteers. This is a BASIC level class that is primarily directed to ground searchers who are new to the use of ropes and webbing. All attendees are expected to participate in the hands-on exercises. Class size is limited to 20 participants. No PPE is required. No equipment is required.

I Dig Your Bones: Human vs. Non-Human Skeletal Anatomy and the Successful Recovery of Human Skeletal Remains in the Field
Nici Vance
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (2B)

Dr. Vance will guide class participants through a crash course in human skeletal anatomy and provide clues regarding how to tell a human bone from a non-human skeletal element. In addition, Nici will describe the methodology employed by law enforcement personnel to successfully and thoroughly recover human skeletal remains in a forensic setting. Be prepared to handle real human skeletal material and biological specimens.

Maps for SAR
Corey Stone
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (3B)

This class will give the students an understanding of maps in general as well as a specific focus on topographical maps used for wilderness SAR. This will include the range of mapping from the Globe to the 7.5 minute quad to the digital printed maps most of us use on searches. Students will learn about scale and series as well as coordinate systems and their markings. The class also includes determining elevation using contour lines and reading terrain features.

Intermediate Knots for Ground Searchers
Al Tong and Rob Cruickshank
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (FE-2B) (Field Exercise
)
This class will build on the basic knot class fundamentals. Tong and Cruickshank will teach additional knots and basic rope system rigging. They will focus on a small number of intermediate level knots and related system rigging that are very useful to ground search volunteers. Topics to include: Alpine butterfly, anchors & rigging plates, bowline (single and interlocking), descenders and belay devices, Munter, super Munter and tie off, pulleys, radium release hitch and water knots.
This is an INTERMEDIATE level class that is primarily directed to ground searchers who have a basic understanding of ropes and webbing. All attendees are expected to participate in the hands-on exercises. Class size is limited to 12 participants. No PPE is required. No equipment is required.

Keeping Your Patient Protected – Sheltering
Peter Kummerfeldt
1:30 – 5:00 p.m. (FE-3B) (Field Exercise
)
In this field exercise, each participant will build a variety of shelters under the supervision of the Kummerfeldt, using the equipment and materials that they would normally carry on a search. With a shelter built they will then enhance the shelter so as to provide maximum protection from rain, wind and precipitation for both themselves and a patient (A "patient" will be provided for the exercise).

Technology

DeLorme inReach Screen Edition – The Latest 2-way Satellite Communicator for SOS, Text/Email and Tracking
Donnie Hatch
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (1C)

Learn to stay connected and safe anywhere in the world with the two-way satellite communication solution — inReach SE — from DeLorme. Featuring a color screen, virtual keyboard, slim design and long-lasting internal lithium battery, this rugged Screen Edition of inReach is waterproof, dustproof and impact resistant to withstand just about any adventure.
When used in conjunction with DeLorme's free Earthmate app and Explore website, the seamless inReach experience provides worry-free navigation and journey tracking with unlimited downloadable topographic maps, NOAA charts, and GPS position updates. Family and friends can even log into your MapShare page to follow a detailed breadcrumb trail of your trip, ping your location, and send messages.
In this session, participants will learn of inReach's SOS capability provides peace of mind by automatically triggering remote tracking and allowing users to describe and update their situation so proper resources can be deployed (in standalone or paired mode).

Garmin Handhelds and Software
Travis Withers, Jon Josephson, Brian Davis and David Cousineau
1:30 - 3:00 p.m. (2C)
3:30 - 5:00 p.m.  (FE-2C)

In this classroom session, Garmin's trainers will discuss features and functions of the GPSMap 62, Alpha, Astro, and Rino handheld series. They will also review Trip Planning software Basecamp and the handheld tracking software known as BaseStation.  In the field exercise portion, they will cover setting waypoints, Track management and also how to get search patterns into Garmin handhelds.  The classroom session will be repeated on Saturday, October 5, 2013, from 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., and will have a K9 focus to the presentation.

Radish Works Mission Manager
Jeff Beckman
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (3C)

In this session, Beckman, an operation leader for the San Diego Mountain Rescue Team, will introduce the features of Mission Manager, software for Search and Rescue and law enforcement agencies. This service has proven itself as a leading search tool on searches for lost persons. Advanced mapping and personnel tracking features will also be discussed.

 

Medicine

Northwest Environmental Injuries
Garth Hope-Melnick
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (1D)

This session will be focusing on common injury and illness patterns that are experienced by patients in the NW Region. Concentration will be placed on crush injuries, harness induced suspension trauma, heat illness, acute mountain sickness, wilderness dermatology, and anaphylaxis. These six topics have shown over time to be some of the more common patterns found in the care of patients in this region.

Patient Assessment and Triage
Taneka Burwell-Means

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (2D)

This patient assessment and triage session is an assessment system geared toward the BLS Provider. It will provide responders a way to efficiently assess and triage patients within a wilderness setting. Assessment differences between urban and rural/wilderness settings will be explored. In addition, multiple triage systems will be introduced and compared in preparation for a Wilderness MCI drill later in the medical track.

Medical Lessons from Combat
USAF 304th Rescue Squadron
1:30 - 3:00 p.m. (2Da)

For over 12 years of recent conflict, the Pararescuemen of the 304th have been applying life saving medical treatment in multiple combat zones.  This segment of training will discuss some of the lessons learned in the combat environment with a particular focus on trauma.  In addition, this environment has provided opportunities to practice procedures not yet in main stream EMS that will be introduced and discussed.  This classroom session will be repeated on Saturday, October 5, 2013, from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m.

Patient Packaging
Robert Glaeser
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (3D)

In this session, Glaeser will demonstrate safe and efficient packaging of a patient within various wilderness rescue environments. The class will focus on packaging techniques that emphasize patient stabilization, comfort, and access for continuous medical assessment during evacuation. Instruction will be in the following categories: Hyper/hypothermia packaging, Stokes litter packaging, use of the S.K.E.D. device, basic knots, carrying techniques, and extended stay considerations.

K9

K9 Trailing
Luis H. Ledbetter and Jenna Mendez
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 1E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Human Remains Detection K9
Edwin Grant and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 2E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Traditional K9 Air Scent
Colin Baessler and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 3E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Enhanced SAR

Simple Field Fixes for Vehicles
Bill Burke
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (1F)

In this classroom session, Burke will demonstrate how to diagnose problems (big or small) and effectively repair engine malfunctions, drive-line breaks, tires (valve stems, flats) and other common problems that can happen while in the field. He will also discuss ways to get a vehicle back to the trailhead, towing on technical terrain, and what equipment makes life better when a truck breaks or quits working in the backcountry.

SAR Tracking -- Man Tracking in Search and Rescue Operations
US Border Patrol Search Trauma & Rescue (BORSTAR) Team Members
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Classroom (1Fa)
1:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-1Fa)

This course will introduce the usage of tracking to the SAR operator and illustrate how tracking skills can be learned and utilized for SAR operations. Topics will include but not be limited to: Defining traffic; the uses and limitations of different types of tracking and how these apply to the SAR Manager and Operator; the elements of tracking; integration of the interview with the tracking product – two way information flow; data gathering from tracks; operational strategies for tracking teams; and speed tracking.
The field exercise will have the participant learn to see the tracks, track patterns, how to gather data from tracks, learn team tracking methods and how to scenario track. Minimum safety equipment necessary for the field exercise is field cloths, water, notebook, pencil, tape measure and walking stick.    

4WD Vehicle Operations Off-Road: What 4-Wheel Drive Really Is!
Bill Burke
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Classroom (2F)
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-2F)

Personal and Fleet vehicle decisions are important when there are so many unknowns about what 4WD really means. What is ETC, ABS, VST, ATRAC, IFS, lockers, limited slip? How does a differential affect traction in loose terrain? Suspensions, power-train, original and aftermarket equipment options, tire selection, All-Wheel Drive, symmetrical drive, full-time 4-wheel drive and part-time 4-wheel drive? This session will put this all together so you will be more informed, more confident and more aware when operating any vehicle drive system in technical terrain and on-highway as well. Vehicle selection, safety issues, vehicle dynamics and mechanical theory will be covered. We'll follow up with an in-field session so the theory will sink in as we observe and operate vehicles on a short skill building road section. 4WD vehicles are NOT required for this session.


Essential Mounted SAR Orienteering
Laurie Adams and Kate Beardsley
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Classroom (2Fa)
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-2Fa)

In the classroom portion of this session, we will have a review of basic orienteering with a map and compass. We will explore how to most affectively get an accurate bearing and back azimuth. This will then be translated to the saddle.
In the field we will use the lateral and yield movements of a horse to assist with accurate orienteering. This session is limited to 20 mounted participants. There is no limit for un-mounted participants.

Helicopter Safety
REACH Air Medical Services
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-3F)

In this ground and helicopter demonstration, REACH Air Medical Services will discuss safety around helicopters during operations, demonstrate loading and unloading of patients and how to set up a Landing Zone.

Water Rescue

Risk Management Through Technology and Decontamination
Jessica Harned
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (1G)

In this session, Harned will demonstrate the importance in minimizing contact with contaminants and decreasing the risk of cross contamination through decontamination procedures for Public Safety Divers.

Witness Interview and Last Seen Point/Andrews Drill
Jerry Richert
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Classroom (2G)
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-2G)

This will be a two-part session consisting of a classroom presentation and outdoor field exercise. During this session students will learn to identify, prioritize and interview witnesses involved in all types of water rescue/recovery incidents. In addition students will learn how to set up and conduct the "Andrews Drill" as part of their department or team training. By the end of this session students will be able to establish a "Last Scene Point" by utilizing simple techniques learned in the "Andrews Drill", and from information gathered during the witness interview.


 

Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013


Stories from Iceland SAR
12:30 - 1:30 p.m.,  Cascade Activity Center

Grab your lunch and join Siggeir (Siggi) Palsson and Arni Freyr Runarsson from the Björgunarsveitin Sudurnes SAR team in Keflavik, Iceland. The all-volunteer team has a diverse mission that includes open ocean rescue boats, rigid inflatable boats, dive rescue and recovery, and ground and vehicle rescue operations. The team is also responsible for responding to mass-casualty events at Keflavik International Airport. Members of the team were the first International USAR team on the ground following the devastating earthquake in Haiti. The team is a part of the national ICE-SAR organization. Siggi and Arni will provide a look at volunteer SAR operations in Iceland, as well as the specific mission of the Sudurnes team.

EVENING: Northwest SARCon Banquet

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. • dinner served at 6 p.m. • entertainment begins at 6:30 p.m.
Cascade Activity Center
Come and celebrate with your friends and colleagues at the annual Northwest SARCon banquet. This catered event will be serving an impressive buffet dinner and a no-host bar. After a relaxing dinner, sit back and enjoy the Northwest’s very own Comic Cop, Willie Halliburton!
Your name badge will be required to enter the banquet. For those who purchased additional banquet tickets, you may pick up your guest’s badge at the Registration table on the day of the event.
After the event, join us fireside at the Cedar Grove Amphitheatre with Bill Burke and here his own adventure story, which he calls “How I Managed to Survive and Lived to Talk About It!” We are quite certain this will be an evening to remember!

SAR Management

Missing At Risk: Understanding and Managing the Search for the Missing At-Risk Alzheimer's and Dementia Subject
Kimberly Kelly
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (4A) Part 1 of 2
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (5A) Part 2 of 2

Every day across the United States, at-risk people are reported missing and its law enforcement, search and rescue and fire/public safety personnel that are responsible to bring these people back safely.  This type of call is becoming more commonplace in the United States and many underestimate the severity of damage that a person with cognitive disabilities faces when unguided or lost.  
This two part class is a comprehensive course designed for law enforcement, search and rescue, and fire/EMS/public safety personnel who may encounter, or search for, a subject with Alzheimer’s, dementia or cognitive disabilities.  This is a two part presentation and updated from last year to give new information about recent events and lessons learned.

A Pararescue Perspective:  Applying Lessons Learned from the War Zone to the Home Front
Adam Tingey
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (6A)

In this session, you’ll explore the critical lessons learned from US Air Force Pararescue teams while operating in both Iraq and Afghanistan.  Participants will discuss how to apply these time and life saving lessons to humanitarian SAR operations in order to increase overall effectiveness and safety of first responders.

Managing External Influences in SAR
Tygh Thompson
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (7A)

SAR missions are frequently subject to any number of external influences, including family and friends of the missing subject, media, political influences, psychics, and spontaneous volunteers.  If not managed properly, any of these groups can draw significant energy away from the search effort and present a negative image of the search to the public.  
This course will explore many techniques for properly managing these influences to reduce their negative impact on the search and even turn their efforts and interest into a positive result.

Wilderness

Peter Kummerfeldt
A Better Way to Build a Fire
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. (4B)

In this session, Kummerfeldt will teach practical fire craft skills that enable a Searcher to start fires under adverse conditions to warm themselves and their patient, to signal, dry clothing, prevent and treat hypothermia, melt snow for water, cook food and to maintain morale. A wide variety of heat producing devices will be demonstrated. The session will introduce the brace and platform method of building a fire to the participants.

Basic Knots for Ground Searchers (REPEAT)
Al Tong
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. (FE-4B) (Field Exercise
)
See Friday's Field Session for description.

Getting Rescued Quickly
Peter Kummerfeldt
11:00 – 12:30 p.m. (5B)

In this session, Kummerfeldt highlights the vital role played by the Searcher in effecting their own recovery and that of a victim should rescue become necessary. The use of commercial and improvised signaling equipment will be covered and the procedures to attract the attention of rescuers – either ground forces or airborne searchers will be reviewed.

Plotting of Universal Transverse Mercator
Corey Stone
11:00 – 12:30 p.m. (5Ba)

In this session, Stone will discuss what UTM is and how to use a UTM Grid reader (to be provided to each student for free) to accurately plot a position to ten square meters. This will include theory and application that enables the student to plot or find a UTM coordinate to a level that exceeds the OSSA standard. This would be a hands-on class with paper maps and plotters, a demonstration of Terrain Navigator would also be shown.

Precision Compass Operation for SAR
Corey Stone
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (6B) (Classroom)
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (FE-6B) (Field Exercise
)
This session will give the student the skills to shoot and take bearings with a mirrored base plate compass accurately by using the features of the compass to ensure consistency in all conditions. The student will also use the compass to orient a map magnetically and use it as a protractor to determine single bearings on a map as well as bearings between two points. Students are encouraged to bring their own suitable compass, or one will be provided for the duration of the class. Maps will also be provided. Attendees need to participate in the classroom session before attending the field exercise.
The field session portion of this session will provide a practical application of the proper operation of the mirrored base plate compass. Simple exercises that students can replicate for their own teams will be used to practice the fundamentals of consistent accuracy. Particular emphasis will be given to trouble shooting errors in the technique of others.

Rough Terrain Safety for Ground Searchers
Al Tong and Rob Cruickshank
1:30 – 5:00 p.m. (FE-6Ba) (Field Exercise
)
In this field exercise, participants will learn rope and webbing techniques for ground search operations. This class is primarily directed to ground search teams that want to enhance team safety while searching in a rough terrain environment. We will be descending and ascending a steep river bank using basic technical gear that can be carried in a 24 hour SAR pack. Topics and techniques will include: Site evaluation (where are you going and how to get there safely), personal protection equipment (PPE), rope, webbing and gear setup, and Munter hitch belay and Munter hitch rappel.
All attendees are expected to participate in the exercise. This is a fast paced course. Knowledge of basic rope and webbing knots is required. Those knots include; figure 8, water knot, overhand on a bight, Prussik, munter hitch and Swiss seat. You must be able to tie these knots without assistance. Depending on your skill level, you may need to attend the Basic Knots for Ground Searchers class. PPEs required (see  HYPERLINK "http://www.NWSARCon.com" www.NWSARCon.com for PPE list). Class size is limited to 16 participants.

Keeping Your Patient Protected -- Fires and Fire Craft
Peter Kummerfeldt
1:30 – 5:00 p.m.  (FE-6Bb) (Field Exercise)

In this hands-on field exercise, each participant will collect the fuel need to build and maintain a fire. When sufficient materials have been collected the participant will be instructed in the effective methods of igniting tinder and building a fire using the platform and brace technique. Once a fire reaches the self-sustaining level the participant will then use the fire to re-warm a patient (a "patient" will be provided for the exercise).

Using Nutrition Skills for Mental and Physical Performance: A Practical Approach for SAR
Ingrid Skoog
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (7B)

How can fueling type, quantity and timing help you prepare for and perform your work as a SAR professional? How our body functions each day is a direct result of providing ourselves adequate food and water. The rescue work, adrenaline, stress and activities of daily living create opportunities for us to take a look at foods role in reaching these goals and objectives we put on our body. In this session, Skoog, a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, will look at situation specific and lifestyle nutrition/fueling tactics that meet your body's needs. This will NOT be your average nutrition education presentation.

Technology

Drones to the Rescue: An Introduction to Low-Cost Unmanned Aircraft Systems
Patrick Sherman and Brian Zvaigzne
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (4C)

Over the past few years, the rapid pace of technological innovation has allowed hobbyists to build Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) that rival the capabilities of similar-sized commercial and military drones, but at a tiny fraction of the cost. In this introductory session, the Roswell Flight Test Crew describes how multirotor aircraft operate, how First-Person View (FPV) systems work, as well as the capabilities and limitations of these systems and their potential applications in search and rescue. Using this technology, the operator is able to see and capture high-definition video of people and objects in remote, impassible locations and even deliver small payloads.

Droning On: Multirotor Unmanned Aircraft System Flight Demonstration
Patrick Sherman and Brian Zvaigzne
11:00 – 12:30 p.m. (FE-5C) (Field Exercise
)
During this field demonstration, the Roswell Flight Test Crew will conduct flight operations using its Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS). These multirotor aircraft are capable of taking off and landing vertically – like a helicopter – as well as achieving speeds of 40 miles per hour, traveling a half-mile or more from their operator and transmitting back real-time video and telemetry. Participants will have the opportunity to try on a pair of video goggles to gain a pilot's-eye perspective on the flight, watch a remote payload delivery and see how a FLIR thermal imaging camera can be integrated into the aircraft's First-Person View system, to enhance detection of search targets.

Garmin Handhelds and Softward w/K9 Emphasis (REPEAT)
Travis Withers, Jon Josephson, Brian Davis, and David Cousineau
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (5C)

Please see session 2C for description. The Field Exercise is not included in this session.

GIS: Leveraging Technology for Search & Rescue
Andy Volokitin
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (6C)

In this session, Volokitin will present a review of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) for the Search & Rescue professional. Participants will learn what GIS is, how it can help them on their missions, software tools available and see 'Real World' examples.

Radish Works Mission Manager (Repeat)
Jeff Beckman
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (7C)

See Session 3C for Description.

Medicine

Fracture and Dislocation Management
Carrie Friend and Thomas Koehler
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. (4D) Part 1 of 2

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (5D) Part 2 of 2

This fracture and dislocation management session is aimed at giving a BLS Provider the tools to appropriately assess and manage the full complement of extremity fractures/dislocations in the wilderness environment. The session will be team taught by two experienced Paramedics in order to implement a small group atmosphere and maximize hands-on time with the various techniques. Techniques include the use of commercial immobilization devices as well as improvisation techniques. Injury patterns included in the lesson are as follows: Spinal immobilization; NEXUS criteria, extremity fractures: dislocation of the shoulder, hip, and patella; as well as pelvic stabilization. In addition, time will be spent on the assessment and management of athletic injuries that may occur to First Responders while working in the field.

Wilderness Static Case Scenarios
Joe Rabinowitz et. al.
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (6D) Part 1 of 2
3:30 - 5:00 p.m. (7D) Part 2 of 2

The Wilderness Static Case Scenario class is a 3-hour hands-on practical session for small groups to practice patient assessment and management techniques of common wilderness injuries or illnesses. The class is meant to supplement topics covered in the different lectures into a practical hands-on environment prior to the Dynamic MCI Drill. Participants will be distributed into small groups and rotate through multiple case scenarios so each group has a chance to manage different wilderness injuries or illnesses. The scenarios will take place in the field so participants will be expected to prepare and dress appropriately.

Medical Lessons from Combat
USAF 304th Rescue Squadron
3:30 - 5:00 p.m. (7Da)

See session 2Da for description.

K9

K9 Trailing
Luis H. Ledbetter and Jenna Mendez
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 1E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Human Remains Detection K9
Edwin Grant and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 2E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Traditional K9 Air Scent
Colin Baessler and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.(Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 3E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.


Enhanced SAR

Simple Field Fixes for Vehicles (Repeat)
Bill Burke
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. (4F)

See session 1F for description.

SAR ATV Operations - Optimizing the Safe Utilization of ATV's in Search & Rescue
U.S. Border Patrol Search, Trauma & Rescue (BORSTAR) Team members
9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. (4Fa)

This course will address topics relating the use of ATVs with the tasks involved in search and rescue operations. Topics will include an ATV overview of the basic mechanical features of an ATV, the proper ATV selection for type of terrain, and rider experience, and appropriate missions for an ATV from both the search management as well as the SAR operator perspectives. ATV Safety for rider fitness, proper selection and loading of equipment, gear, tools, and transport methods of ATVs and appropriate Rider Safety Equipment for SAR Teams and what should agencies or teams set as a minimum standard for this equipment will be discussed.
Important ATV operations scenarios to be discussed are: Common trail repairs; riding strategies; tracking from ATVs; route finding decisions; dealing with downed trees; what to do with a stuck vehicle; towing disabled ATVs; and rules of the trail.
The field exercises will include navigation of obstacle course, stuck vehicle recovery, sign cutting from ATV and short trail/road ride. Minimum safety equipment required: motorcycle/ATV approved helmet, goggles and protective gloves.

Essential Mounted SAR Search Techniques
Laurie Adams and Kate Beardsley
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. Classroom (4Fb)
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-4Fb)

This session will start in the classroom with an overview of mounted search techniques. In the field we will practice several of these techniques, including Hasty searching on a trail as a containment team, to a mounted line search team able to search large areas with high POD results in small amounts of time (20 acres, in 45 min with a POD of 80%). This session would be useful for incident management to attend in order to see how mounted units can adapt to a large range of scenarios and maximize the benefits of using horses as a SAR Resource. This session is limited to 20 mounted participants. There is no limit for un-mounted participants.

4WD Off-Road Vehicle Recovery: Getting Your 4WD Unstuck and Safe Extrication of Rescued Vehicles
Bill Burke
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (5F)

In this classroom session, Burke will cover formulating a quality recovery plan for yourself or the rescued vehicle. Topics will include: Stuck Assessment, Mire Factor, Working Load Limits, rigging, equipment selection and safety, terminology and technology, identifying load resistance versus work effort, familiarity of jacks, winches, straps and blocks. Industry safety protocols will also be presented.

Equine Scent Detection
Terry Nowacki
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Classroom (6F)
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-6F)

In the classroom presentation, Nowacki will demonstrate the benefits of Equine Scent Detection for mounted search and rescue and Natural Horsemanship. All Mounted SAR responders should have knowledge of their equines natural scenting capabilities and be able to recognize equine sign language as it pertains to scent detection. Using scent detection is the purest form of natural horsemanship. For more information please go to www.airscentinghorse.com
In the field exercise, learn techniques and see firsthand an advanced scent detection horse following a scent drift in order to find a hidden subject.

Helicopter Hoist Demonstration
U.S. Coast Guard
1:30 – 3 p.m. (landing around 1 p.m.) (FE-USCG)


4WD Off-Road Vehicle Recovery in Action
Bill Burke
1:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-7F)

Burke will demonstrate and students will handle all types of recovery equipment. This session will include hands-on familiarity with the Hi-Lift Jack, winch, traction devices, dynamic ropes and straps, chain, connections, rigging and use of blocks.
Also covered: demonstration and evaluation of Stuck Assessment and resistance factors of load to rigging ratio – for all vehicle sizes and compilation — and use of standard vehicle equipment as well as aftermarket equipment. The session will also discuss how to get rocks out of dual tires, risk management and Incident Command for safe extrication techniques. Tips and tricks will be demonstrated for a safe and reliable recovery. You do not need a 4WD for this field session. Class is limited to 12 vehicles and 20 persons.

Water Rescue

Using Side Scan Sonar and ROV for Underwater Search and Recovery
Gene Ralston
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (4G)

In this session, Ralston will discuss the advantages of using side scan sonar in the search for drowning victims and other objects missing underwater. The advantages, disadvantages, and comparison of different types of sonar will be presented. Participants will learn how sonar creates images as well as how to interpret images and how to set up and execute a sonar search. Example side scan images will be shown to demonstrate imaging principles.

Swiftwater Awareness
Rob Wurpes and Nate Thompson
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-4G)

Many search operations take place near some sort of water way. It is highly beneficial for the search and rescue professional to have a basic awareness of water safety for themselves and/or search partners and victims. This full day field exercise will cover the basics of specialized equipment, water hydrology, and basic self/partner rescue techniques. This course will involve swimming and the navigation of difficult terrain. Specialized equipment such as dry suits, thermals, gloves, PFD, helmet and shoes are required. Students are encouraged to bring their own equipment. Please indicate sizes needed at registration if you will need loaner equipment. This field exercise is limited to 12 participants.

Risk Management Through Standards
Jessica Harned
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (5G)

In this session, Harned will discuss the importance of dive team standards to minimize risk and will introduce the new future NFPA standards for Public Safety Divers.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
Dr. Alejandro Perez
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (6G)

In this session, Dr. Perez will describe hyperbaric oxygen applications for search and rescue.  This presentation will include principles of hyperbaric oxgyen therapy, carbon monoxide intoxication, decompression sickness, acute traumatic injuries and controversial applications of hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

Dive Team Organization and Management
Jerry Richert
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (7G)

During this session students will learn the importance of Dive Team Management and will be given the tools to implement this system at their departments. Topics to be covered will include mission statements, management structure, risk management and pre-screening and selection of dive team members, in addition to other related topics. At the end of this class students will be able to identify the importance of Dive Team Management and Organization. They will also take with them the tools needed to develop and implement this system at their department or team.


Sunday, Oct. 6, 2012


SAR Management

Australian Search Case Study
Hugh Dougher
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (8A)

As search manager in the 2013 search for an Australian Alps bushwalker, the speaker will explore the history and unique challenges of the incident, and the clue-analysis process used to determine the primary search area.

Effective SAR Risk Management Strategies
Hugh Dougher
10:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. (9A)

In this 2-hour session, Dougher will present ten strategies for implementing effective SAR risk management.  One of these strategies – SAR GAR – will be discussed in particular detail as it is based on the Operational Leadership/Team Coordination Training/Operational Risk Management model practiced by federal agencies with SAR responsibilities.  GAR has been adopted as a national standard through the Catastrophic Incident Search and Rescue Addendum to the National Response Framework; and is a Washington State core competency for SAR volunteers.

Determining the Search Urgency
Craig McClure
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (10A)

In this session, McClure will present a practical case study based discussion of how to determine search urgency along with an anecdotal discussion of subject survival and search duration.

Oregon SAR Forms – Introduction and Application
Craig McClure
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (11A)

In this session, McClure will present a hands-on introduction to the content, use, and purpose of the OSSA SAR forms packet. Students are encouraged to bring a laptop and a thumbdrive to be able to work with the forms individually in class.  This class will also be used to gather feedback for changes or improvements to the forms.

 

Wilderness

Getting Rescued Quickly (Repeat)
Peter Kummerfeldt
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. (8B)

See session 5B for description.

Rigging the Sked Stretcher for Basic and Advanced Rescues (Land, Air and Water)
Marcel Rodriguez
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (FE-8B) (Field Exercise
)
Teams worldwide are familiar with the Sked evacuation stretcher. Nearly every team worldwide possesses a Sked stretcher, but few teams are aware of the full capabilities and rigging techniques to get the most out of this versatile piece of equipment. This session will look at basic rigging and at some of the lesser-known capabilities of the Sked and will review proper rigging techniques for vertical and horizontal high-angle rescues, snow/glacier rescues, helicopter lifts, swiftwater rescue, and ice and dive rescues.

GPS Land Navigation
Blake Miller
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (9B) Classroom
1:30 – 5:00 p.m. (FE-9B) (Field Exercise
)
This session will present a hands-on, real-time button pushing class where students learn the basic operating features of hand held GPS receivers. The classroom focus is placed on the practical aspects of the GPS System and how to properly set-up individual units for field operations. The class discusses common mistakes and lessons learned from different experiences in the backcountry. The field practical exercise combines key features of the GPS receiver to successfully navigate, mark waypoints, and use the track log. Additionally, the field exercise demonstrates the critical need to correlate both the GPS unit with a map and compass. Table top and field exercises are linked to topographic maps and associated grid system. Students must bring their personal GPS receiver for this class.

Test Your Survival Knowledge
Peter Kummerfeldt
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (9Ba)

In this session Kummerfeldt will present a broad ranging, self-critiquing quiz that challenges the participants knowledge and beliefs regarding a wide variety of survival and outdoor safety topics. After the forty-question critique is completed the Kummerfeldt will review each question and insure that the participants have a clear understanding of the issues that were raised.

Keeping Your Patient Protected – Sheltering (REPEAT)
Peter Kummerfeldt
1:30 – 5:00 p.m. (FE-10B) (Field Exercise
)
See Friday's Field Exercise for Description

Effective use of Mountains Bikes for Search and Rescue
Richard Adler
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (10B)

Mountain bikes can be a very effective tool to help resolve SAR missions. They can be deployed rapidly and move quickly through areas of high probability. In this course, Adler will teach you how to effectively use the mountain bike for hasty searching, containment, and reach and treat.

24 Hour SAR Pack (REPEAT)
John Carlson
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (11B)

This session centers around what the SAR Pack, along with your skills and teamwork, should help you accomplish on SAR missions. A discussion of the equipment suggested for SAR use, methods of carrying, and the skills found useful on missions will also be presented. No PPE required.

 

Technology

24 Hour SAR Pack
John Carlson
9:00 - 10:30 a.m. (8C)
This session centers around what the SAR Pack, along with your skills and teamwork, should help you accomplish on SAR missions. A discussion of the equipment suggested for SAR use, methods of carrying, and the skills found useful on missions will also be presented. No PPE required.  This session will be repeated from 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 6, 2013.

All Thumbs: Learning to Fly Remote-Control Rotorcraft
Patrick Sherman and Brian Zvaigzne
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (9C)

Before launching hobby-built Small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS) to conduct search and rescue missions, would-be drone pilots need to first master the basics of flight. This session will begin with an introduction to the fundamentals of "eyes-on" radio-controlled aviation then provide participants with the opportunity to try it themselves using simulators and palm-sized rotorcraft. Hands-on exercises will be limited by the availability of simulators and aircraft, as well as space to fly safely. No equipment or prior experience is necessary, but please come prepared to follow instructions, operate delicate equipment and be aware of your environment.

Bridging the Gap: 911 and SAR
Michelle Renault
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (10C)

Bridging the gap between 911 and SAR, discusses 911's role and the challenges we face. We will walk through the process of call taking, activation of a SAR, the working relationships with all parties involved, the technology, communications, "Tricks of the Trade" used and the documentation of the event. We will also review a SAR mission and discuss the process used and our lessons learned. Then we will follow up with how to improve 911's relationship with the SAR teams to better our responses.

Droning On: Multirotor Unmanned Aircraft System Flight Demonstration (Repeat)
Patrick Sherman and Brian Zvaigzne
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (FE-10C) (Field Exercise
)
See Saturday's Field Exercise FE-5C for description.

GIS: Leveraging Technology for Search & Rescue (Repeat)
Andy Volokitin
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (11C)

See session 6C for description.

Medicine

Wilderness Dynamic MCI Drill
Joe Rabinowitz et. al.
9 – 9:15 a.m. (8D) BRIEFING
9:15 – 12:30 p.m. (FE-9D) Field Exercise

This 3-hour drill will take place outdoors and is an opportunity for participants to engage in a dynamic wilderness multiple casualty incident. Participants will be expected to locate, triage, manage, safely package, and evacuate multiple patients. The dynamic component of the drill and difference from the static exercises will include team triage decisions, resource management, radio communications, evacuation decisions, and appropriate documentation. Multiple experienced SAR providers and a team Physician will be present to act as proctors of individual patient scenarios within the drill as a whole. As an educational component, the proctors will assess a group's decision matrices and actions. Critiques will be compiled and brought to the MCI Drill Debriefing for review and discussion. The drill will take place in the field so participants will be expected to prepare and dress appropriately.

Pediatrics in the Wilderness
Garth Hope-Melnick
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (10D)

Pediatrics in the Wilderness is a class focusing on special needs for successfully taking children into the wilderness in addition to assessment/management techniques for pediatric injuries or illnesses. It will include different preparation and safety techniques, pediatric anatomy differences, adjustments for pediatric packaging, and methods for assisting family members.

MCI Drill Debriefing with SAR Providers and Physician
Joe Rabinowitz et. al.
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. (11D)

The MCI Drill Debriefing will be a good opportunity for responders to ask questions regarding the drill as a whole or an individual scenario within the drill. All proctors, lead instructors, and Physicians will be present to provide a critique of each group's decision matrices and actions. It will also be an opportunity for the Physicians to talk about what their expectations are as well as give clinical advice to our work done in the pre-hospital wilderness care environment.

K9

K9 Trailing
Luis H. Ledbetter and Jenna Mendez
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (10E) (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 1E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Human Remains Detection K9
Edwin Grant and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (11E) (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 2E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Traditional K9 Air Scent
Colin Baessler and Luis H. Ledbetter
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (12E) (Orientation/Classroom/Field Exercise)

See Session 3E (Thursday, Oct. 3) for description.

Enhanced SAR

Patient Assessment Packaging & Transport
Laurie Adams and Kate Beardsley
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. Classroom (8F)
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-8F)

This class will present a "best practices" approach to using equine to reach and transport subjects. Horses can be a great resource for quickly finding and transporting injured individual in areas where traditional patient transport cannot be used because of the nature of the wilderness trail, packaging and needs of the patient. This will be a hands-on class with practice in the field. This session will begin in the classroom and then will have attendees practice assessing, packaging and transporting patients on a simulated trail with obstacles. This session is limited to 20 mounted participants. There is no limit for un-mounted participants.

SAR ATV Operations - Optimizing the Safe Utilization of ATV's in Search & Rescue (Repeat)
US Border Patrol Search, Trauma & Rescue (BORSTAR) Team Members
9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. (8Fa)

See Session 4Fa for Description

Advanced 4WD Vehicle Off-Road Operations
Bill Burke
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Classroom (8Fb)
12:00 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-8Fb)

This classroom and field exercise session is ideal for those who have taken other classes with Burke or those who are responsible for vetting and training new members of their SAR Team. Burke will delve deeper into the terminology and techniques of 4WD systems and how to share those years of experience with others based on the Participant Centered training philosophy. Topics to be covered include: consistency of terms, spotting signals, communication, mechanical theory, situational awareness, when mechanical sympathy is too much, when assertive is just right, and technical aspects for IC of recovery and vehicle fleet responsibilities. A practical skill development scenario in classroom for “team leaders” will be demonstrated. This session also covers how to operate a 4WD vehicle in more technical terrain in demanding conditions.
Lunch will not be provided in the field; please plan accordingly. This class is limited to 12 vehicles and 20 participants.

SAR Tracking -- Man Tracking in Search and Rescue Operations (Repeat)
US Border Patrol Search Trauma & Rescue (BORSTAR) Team Members
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Classroom (9F)
1:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-9F)

See Session 1Fa for Description

Essential Mounted SAR Mock Search
Terry Nowacki, Laurie Adams & Kate Beardsley
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Classroom (10F)
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-10F)

This class will culminate NW SARCon's Mounted SAR classes and instruction. It will start in the classroom with an overview of Mounted SAR as a Resource for SAR Coordinators. In the field we will demonstrate in a mock search how Mounted SAR recourses can be used. The attendees will practice their skills, from Equine Air Scent Detection awareness, mounted orienteering and patient transport to search techniques in the mock search. Team assignments will be varied with appropriate POD expectations and teams reporting back with results including POD. This would be useful for SAR Coordinators and incident management to view, gaining firsthand knowledge of how to maximize the benefits of using horse as a MSAR Resource and see how mounted units can be used and adapt to a large range of scenarios. This session is limited to 20 mounted participants. There is no limit for un-mounted participants.

Water Rescue

Shallow Water Crossing
Rob Wurpes and Nate Thompson
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Field Exercise (FE-8G)

Many search operations take place near some sort of water way and often involve moving across small streams. This class will teach searchers safe techniques for crossing small streams and rivers. Students can learn what their limitations are when it comes to crossing moving water at different depths and either solo or in groups. This full day field exercise will cover the basics of self/partner/group river crossing, water hydrology, and self rescue techniques. This course will involve swimming and the navigation of difficult terrain. Specialized equipment such as dry suits, thermals, gloves, PFD, helmet and shoes are required. Students are encouraged to bring their own equipment. Please indicate sizes needed at registration if loaner equipment is needed. This field exercise is limited to 12 students.

Using Side Scan Sonar and ROV for Underwater Search and Recovery (Repeat)
Gene Ralston
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (8G)

In this repeat session, Ralston will discuss the advantages of using side scan sonar in the search for drowning victims and other objects missing underwater. The advantages, disadvantages, and comparison of different types of sonar will be presented. Participants will learn how sonar creates images as well as how to interpret images and how to set up and execute a sonar search. Example side scan images will be shown to demonstrate imaging principles.

Managing Small Water Rescues
Dick Rice
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (9G)

It has become universally recognized that for ICS to work well, "some subject matter expertise" needs to be available in technical water rescues to safely and effectively perform the water based incidents that are occurring in your response area, whether shore based or boat based (or both). This session will introduce the incident manager to management techniques that are specific to technical water rescues.

Managing Large Water Rescues
Dick Rice
1:30 – 3:00 p.m. (10G)

Floods and other large water incidents are multi-jurisdictional, multi-agency, long term events. This session will introduce the incident manager to flood or other large scale water incidents to the specific management techniques required to anticipate and recognize the different phases of the flood and how to address the logistics and different techniques required, with an emphasis on boat based rescue management.