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Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Monday Evening Registration: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday Registration: 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.


8:00 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.

Matthew SanduskyWelcome and Keynote:
Undaunted

Matthew Sandusky
Matthew shares his personal and powerful story of overcoming sexual abuse as a child. This program will empower the audience with knowledge about the grooming process -- and the telltale signs that can help identify abusers and those being abused.



9:45 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

BREAK
Visit Summit Store & Exhibits


10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

1A
Finding Trace: Fusing the Forensic Interview with Forensic Evidence
Sally K. Sheppard, LCSW, and Jeremy C. Howell
This workshop will fuse the link between a disclosure of child abuse during the forensic interview and the forensic evidence that can be gathered from a crime scene. The workshop will also focus on the need for various disciplines to work together in a team approach in sharing information that may lead to a stronger criminal case. Workshop participants will be given a detailed explanation on what types of corroborating physical and trace evidence can be found by crime-scene specialists as well as the equipment utilized to find even the slightest of trace evidence.
This workshop also provides basic explanation in the use of an alternate light source (ALS) and methods for recognizing and collecting technological-based evidence.  This will further the forensic interviewer’s knowledge about corroborating physical and trace evidence -- and assist in crafting the forensic interview in order to strengthen the case beyond the word of a child victim.  This workshop also promotes the collaboration between those that interview child victims and those that collect evidence at the scene of the crime.
The primary intended audience would be those within the field of law enforcement (most specifically those working child abuse and sexual assault cases), as well as those who work in the field of social work as court appointed special advocates or in child protective services and children's advocacy centers (as both family advocates and forensic interviewers). This training would also be beneficial for forensic nurses working in the field of child abuse and sexual assault who want to learn additional ways to collect evidence on a body.  Prosecutors of child abuse and sexual assault cases will learn additional ways those gathering evidence can find additional evidence to strengthen the case.
This information is new and pressing, because it assists with the validation of a child's disclosure of abuse by bringing together the link between the child's disclosure of abuse and the physical evidence that can be found in the area where the abuse occurred.  Case studies and research have shown that evidence to corroborate a child's statement about the abuse can be found at the scene of the abuse months and even years after the disclosure.  Once those involved in the case  this information, it can add validation to the child's statement. 
This session will be repeated Tuesday, April 17 from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

1B
Child Torture as a Form of Child Abuse
Premi Thomas Suresh, MD
Child torture is a form of extreme abuse that goes beyond typical physical abusive injuries and does not fit existing medical definitions or diagnostic criteria for abuse.  This workshop will discuss the rationale for a separate diagnosis of torture, present representative cases, review outcomes, and summarize the definition of this medical diagnosis.
Course participants will recognize common manifestations of child torture; see case examples of representative child torture cases; and learn the medical definition of child torture.

1C
'I Take It Back': When Children Recant Allegations of Sexual Abuse
Carrie L. Paschall
Investigating cases of children and teenagers who have been sexually victimized can be challenging -- but it can be especially challenging when the child later recants their initial allegations.  Many in the field become concerned about the credibility of both the child and the case once this occurs, and it becomes difficult for the MDT to know what to do next. Many times cases are not pursued, and children are left in situations that put them at risk for re-victimization.
This presentation will discuss recantation and its place in the normal process of disclosure, how to investigate a recant, and when and how to interview a child who has recanted. 
A case study with excerpts from forensic interviews will be used to assist in meeting learning objectives.

1D
Juvenile Sex Offenders: A Challenge for the Team
Dan Powers, ACSW, LCSW
Juvenile sex offenders pose an interesting challenge to the multi-disciplinary team. This workshop is intended for interviewers, police officers, CPS workers, medical personnel, family court workers, attorneys, judges, social workers, therapists and anyone else dealing with juvenile sex offenders. This workshop will explore the dynamics and challenges juvenile sex offenders bring to your caseload. We will review types of juvenile sex offenders -- and will suggest a consistent approach in dealing with them from investigation through ongoing treatment.  This session will emphasize the multi-disciplinary team approach as a solution to solving the unique problems these cases bring to the system.
Dynamics of juvenile sex offenders -- including myths commonly accepted by professionals -- will be presented. Theories of etiology will be reviewed and discussed. The different roles of the professionals involved in these types of cases will be examined, as well as suggestions on how a standardized approach in the investigation, assessment and intervention of juvenile sex offenders will benefit the professionals, the offenders and the family.
Objectives:
1. Participants will have an understanding of the dynamics of juvenile sex offenders.
2. Participants will gain an understanding of the multi-disciplinary team approach as a solution to this problem.
3. Participants will understand the need for accountability for juvenile sex offenders.
4. Participants will gain an understanding of treatment modalities for juvenile sex offenders and their families.

1E
How to Put Together a Child Pornography Case for Law Enforcement and Prosecutors
Bumjoon Park
What kind of evidence is needed for a child pornography prosecution? What is the prosecutor looking for -- and what should the prosecutor be looking for? If the defendant is making a statement to law enforcement, what should the investigator be asking? What are the kinds of evidence that are important to judges? What kinds of evidence should we be careful about? Deputy District Attorney BJ Park will answer these kinds of questions in how to put together a successful child pornography case.

1F
Getting Her from 'Going' to 'Gone'
Kristen Howell, LMSW
Advocates, first police responders, investigators and prosecutors are routinely frustrated by a battered woman's difficulty terminating her abusive relationship.  This session will provide specific examples and words to help law enforcement and advocates get her from "going" to "gone." Participants will examine ways to facilitate and prepare a woman for a safe outcome -- and ultimately end the abuse.

1G
Adobe for Digital Photo, Video and Audio (Part 1 of 2)
John Penn II
This class will cover the use of digital media tools for law enforcement scenarios. Intermediate Adobe Photoshop, Premiere and Audition will be taught for working with photos, video and audio. 
Attendees should leave the course comfortable and image manipulation and enhancement tools, video tools for stabilizing shaky video, sanitizing videos, and the basics of working with enhancing audio files. Lessons should be applicable to a wide variety of digital media related law enforcement tasks -- from forensics to victim identification to review of body-worn camera footage.
This session continues from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

1H
Commercial Sexual Exploitation:  Using Sub-Cultural Context and Complex-Trauma-Specific Interview Techniques to Garner Successful Disclosures and Build Rapport
Esther Nelson
Advocates and survivors inform this training’s perspective on the ever-evolving landscape of the commercial sex industry, the complex trauma experienced by the victims, and the most trauma-informed methods of intervention.
Trainees will glean real-world examples of how to apply a working knowledge of both the subculture and the unique aspects of its victimization to assist with rapport-building and disclosure.
Intended audience: law enforcement, advocates, attorneys, child welfare, child forensic interviewers, SANE nurses.

1J
Accident or Inflicted:  Investigator, You Decide?
Jim Sears
In this session, Sgt. Sears will be taking some of the recent medical findings and demonstrating what is most likely accidental and what participants will be seeing that is most likely inflicted. The emphasis will be on overcoming myths and misconceptions of physical abuse and focusing strategies on those that have injuries that are inflicted. 
This course covers bone fractures, burns, bruises, and inflicted head trauma, and is intended for first responders, investigators and prosecutors. 

1K
Fatal Distraction: Kids in Cars -- Investigation and Prosecution of Fatal Neglect
Mary-Ann Burkhart, JD
Each year, too many of our children are left alone in cars, resulting in tragic outcomes. This workshop will discuss the most common reasons given for this; what happens to children who are victims of hypo- or hyperthermia; the history of prosecuting cases of parental neglect or child homicide in these types of cases; and tips to investigate and prosecute these most preventable cases.
In this session, the presenter will: Discuss the most common reasons given for leaving infants and toddlers alone in cars; explore how the process of death occurs to children left in cars; and brainstorm investigative and prosecution tips in these most preventable cases of child death.


1CL
ABCs of Online Child Exploitation Investigations (Part 1 of 3)
Jeff Burlew, Paul Farnstrom and Jennifer Newman
This session will be co-presented by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) and the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Interagency Child Exploitation Prevention Team (INTERCEPT). Participants will learn about NCMEC's CyberTipline -- including how it can generate, de-conflict, and corroborate cases related to computer-facilitated crimes against children. An overview of CyberTipline reports will be included, along with a detailed explanation of the reports sent to law enforcement. An investigator will walk the participants through the steps necessary to identify the location of the suspect and specific computers involved in the investigation. Specifics will be shared on how to secure evidence of criminal behavior from electronic service providers (ESP's) as well as on-scene.
This lab is reserved for law enforcement and limited to 40 participants. This workshop will be continued from 1:45 – 3:15 p.m., and 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.  Participants are encouraged to attend all three sessions.


11:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

LUNCH
Visit Summit Store & Exhibits


12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

2B
Failure to Protect: Institutional Response to Child Maltreatment
Amy Russell, MSEd, JD, NCC
Research tells us that resilience is enhanced in children and youth who participate in extracurricular activities, sporting organizations and religion activities. However, multiple recent cases identifying child maltreatment in youth-serving organizations may give pause to caregivers who seek to protect their children from institutional maltreatment.
This session will discuss various types of youth-serving organizations and institutions that fail to adequately respond to child maltreatment that occurs within their purviews; how abuse is enabled in youth sport and youth support settings; and how institutional changes can mitigate these issues.
Issues of perpetrator protection and institutional loyalty will be discussed, and suggestions will be offered as lessons learned from recent high-profile cases.
Learning objectives:
1. Discuss cases of institutional failure to protect
2. Explain issues and concerns that lead to perpetrator protection or institutional loyalty over reporting
3. Identify solutions and recommendations for institutional response to child abuse allegations

2C
Finding Trace: Fusing the Forensic Interview with Forensic Evidence (Repeat)
Sally K. Sheppard, LCSW, and Jeremy C. Howell
See session 1A for description.

2D
Am I the Only One Who Feels This Way?  Wellness Tools for Your Personal Toolbox
Elizabeth Tow and Anthony Maez, MA
STOP! This is one presentation you won’t want to miss.  Join us for an interactive presentation in which we will look at the concerns/questions that you have about what this job does to your mental health and wellness -- and answer those questions with science, nutrition, emotional, and wellness tools and techniques. Build your own toolbox that will add to your resilience and well-being.

2E
Love the One You’re With: Prosecuting Cases with Teen Victims
Mary-Ann Burkhart, JD
When we have teen victims engaging in risky or self-destructive behaviors, there is a reason for those behaviors. This workshop will explore those reasons, how to work with teen victims, and ways to overcome with our jury any potential stigmas associated with those behaviors.
By the end of this workshop, participants will:
• Identify the reasons why our teen victims oftentimes engage in self-destructive and risky behaviors;
• Explore ways in which we can explain those behaviors to our jury in an effort to make the jury understand those behaviors so they can place the blame where it belongs -- on our defendants; and
• Discuss tips and strategies for working with our teen victims.

2G
Adobe for Digital Photo, Video and Audio (Part 2 of 2)
John Penn II
See session 1G for description.

2K
12:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Darkness to Light:  Stewards of Children Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Training
Joshua Gieger, BS, and Sara Taggart, MPA
This workshop will introduce participants to Darkness to Light’s evidence-informed and nationally recognized Stewards of Children child sexual abuse prevention training.
Stewards of Children teaches adults to prevent, recognize and respond to child sexual abuse in organizations, groups and communities. Using a trauma-informed approach, the “5 Steps to Protecting Our Children” curriculum provides participants with a behavioral and cognitive framework for understanding the facts of sexual abuse while learning practical tools for constructive action. 
Reflecting upon video of survivor stories and experts in the field, participants will gain insight into the social and personal norms that allow abuse to perpetuate, and what adults can do to impact change. Participants will leave with a greater understanding of how prevention strategies can be employed to create a community-wide response to child sexual abuse.



12:30 – 5:00 p.m.

2A
Interview & Interrogation: Gaining the Slight Edge
Jon Turbett
Workshop (12:30 – 5:00 p.m.)
Many of our child physical abuse, child sexual abuse and domestic violence cases are unwitnessed and present very little physical evidence. Nationwide, officers have been trained (formally and informally) to disclose evidence and appeal to a suspect’s “best interest” to confess -- a strategy that research has now shown underperforms and is particularly ineffective in cases with little or no physical evidence. The challenge has been compounded in recent times by case law that continues to restrict what an officer can and cannot say when interviewing witnesses and suspects. Getting justice for the victims of these crimes often hangs on the ability of officers to interview and interrogate well. Now more than ever, officers must -- for the sake of their victims -- work hard at their skills and make progress in their ability to get to the truth.
To gain the “slight edge,” officers will be exposed to the current landscape of interview and interrogation in the United States -- including deficiencies in current training; the release of the federally funded research of the High Value Detainee Interrogation group; and the value of widely-used sales and marketing techniques for the police interrogator.
The presenter will demonstrate, through research and experience, how our own misuse and abuse of the now famous “Miranda warnings” has greatly hampered our investigations over the past 50 years. After explaining the United States Supreme Court’s rationale in developing the warnings, the presenter will show who specifically they were designed to protect -- and in what situation the Court actually intended their use. Attendees will learn how to identify those factors which cause state courts to find Miranda custody -- and, conversely, when officers should consider themselves in a truly non-custodial situation. On a very practical level, attendees will see actual examples of officers implementing an effective and proper “non-custodial warning.” Most importantly, attendees will be challenged to rethink how they approach investigations and the suspect interview -- and how in gaining the slight edge legally and tactically we can begin to gain back many of the admissions and confessions we have given up over the last 50 years. Newer and experienced officers alike will be challenged and motivated, as an active police investigator works from foundational principles to street-level execution.
Attendees will be encouraged to be well-balanced -- capable of conducting non-custodial and custodial interviews and interrogations. The presentation will engage the group and address when a custodial warning must be read; who should read it; and how waiver rates are impacted -- both negatively and positively -- by the presentation of those rights by the officer. The presenter will suggest how officers should present Miranda and discuss important invocation and re-initiation issues (including a street-level explanation of several critical United States Supreme Court decisions over the past six to eight years). 
This workshop continues until 5:00 p.m.  Attendees are encouraged to attend the entire workshop.


1:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

BREAK
Visit Summit Store & Exhibits


1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

3A
Interview & Interrogation: Gaining the Slight Edge
Jon Turbett
See session 2A for description.

3B
Vulnerable Child Syndrome or Medical Child Abuse?
Matthew Cox, MD
Vulnerable Child Syndrome describes a physically healthy child who is viewed by a parent as being at greater-than-actual risk for illness. This session will outline the diagnosis using case examples and differentiate it from Medical Child Abuse, with which it can be confused.
Workshop Objectives: Course participants will:
1. Recognize common manifestations of Vulnerable Child Syndrome.
2. Differentiate Vulnerable Child Syndrome from Medical Child Abuse.
3. Learn methods of management of Vulnerable Child Syndrome.
4. Identify characteristics and interventions necessary in Medical Child Abuse.

3C
Discipline, Parenting Styles & Physical Abuse:  The Confusing and Controversial Continuum
Gabrielle Petersen, MSN, CPNP
Physical findings are nearly always needed in order to make a diagnosis of child physical abuse.  However, physical findings alone do not make the diagnosis.  In older children, it is not uncommon for parental discipline and punishment to play a part in the injuries observed on children.  When does discipline and punishment stop and abuse begin?  Additionally, legal definitions of abuse further complicate the matter -- for example, bruises may meet the medical definition of abuse but not the legal definition of abuse.  These cases can be very complex and difficult for partners from various agencies to work together for the best interest of the child and family. 
This session begins with an overview of the medical definition of physical abuse, as well as medical recommendations for discipline and punishment.  Differences by state in legal definitions of abuse will also be reviewed.  The second portion of the presentation will center around case presentations, with the audience participating in a discussion of diagnosis and recommendations. This session will be repeated on Friday, April 20 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

3D
Working with Non-Offending Parents in Child Sexual Abuse Cases
Dan Powers, ACSW, LCSW
This workshop is intended for interviewers, police officers, CPS workers, probation officers, attorneys, judges, social workers, therapists and anyone else dealing with abused children and their non-offending parents. It will review types of non-offending parents and suggest a consistent approach in dealing with them from investigation through ongoing treatment. Your actions can “make or break it” for the next professional dealing with the parent. We will discuss the range of emotions professionals may feel, as well as the “dos and don’ts” of dealing with non-offending parents -- emphasizing the need for a collaborative, consistent approach when dealing with them.
Objectives:
1. Develop a framework for empathy for non-offending parents
2. Gain an understanding of the dynamics and types of non-offending parents
3. Develop a consistent approach in dealing with non-offending parents

3E
Sentencing in Child Pornography Cases
Bumjoon Park
The main conflict in many child pornography cases is the sentencing phase as opposed to the trial phase. Many persons do not understand the true nature of these offenses and incorrectly think that they are “just pictures.” Deputy District Attorney BJ Park will discuss strategies and recommend specific approaches to sentencing in these kinds of cases.

3F
Abusive Minds Think Alike (Part 1 of 2)
Kristen Howell, LMSW, and Carrie L. Paschall
As investigators, we know that usually where there is one form of abuse, there may likely be others. Because of this, it is imperative that we know the characteristics of the many different crimes and offenders we are investigating, as they often reside in the same home and often are the same person. The presentation will discuss some very basic dynamics of child sexual abuse and will correlate the similarities in characteristics of the crime, characteristics of the offender, disclosure process and patterns, victim grooming, recantation, and compliant victim characteristics to those that also exist in domestic violence. Attendees will be able to identify multiple similarities between these two types of offenders. This two-part session continues from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

3G
Children in a Digital Age
Joe Laramie
In an age where technology is in the hands of youth of all ages, the dangers of abuse can affect any child from any background.  These dangers -- ranging from cyberbullying to self-victimization (sexting) to sexual exploitation (sextortion) and abuse -- can be difficult to identify.  Also, preventing these digital abuses often relies upon the failed use of scare tactics, because children and teens don’t see themselves as vulnerable.
This workshop will focus on the variety of digital dangers affecting our youth, the best methods of obtaining disclosures, and effective messaging to prevent digital abuses.  
Objectives:
At the conclusion of this training, attendees will be able to:
1. Describe popular social media used by teens;
2. Define "sexting" and "sextortion";
3. Identify effective technology safety messages; and
4. Define "Law of Closure" and how it relates to communication with youth.

3H
Best Practices for Working Commercial Sexual Exploitation Cases:  Law Enforcement and Advocate Collaboration for Successful Interventions (Part 1 of 2)
Esther Nelson, Mike Gallagher, Jason Ritter
An advocate and a detective team up to discuss the ever-evolving landscape of the commercial sex industry, the complex trauma experienced by the victims, and the most successful methods of intervention when working cases jointly.
Trainees will glean real-world examples of how to navigate power dynamics, and leverage the strengths of both respective roles in order to successfully work commercial sexual exploitation cases.
Intended audience: law enforcement, advocates, attorneys, child welfare, child forensic interviewers, SANE nurses. 
This session will continue from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

3J
When Saving Lives Damages Your Own
Elizabeth Tow and Anthony Maez, MA
Exposure to child sexual exploitation and abuse materials can have widespread and serious negative effects on professionals. Helping exposed individuals learn how to recognize and cope with problems, before they become severe or permanent, is the main priority of the Supporting Heroes in Mental Health Foundational Training (SHIFT) Program.  This course will introduce the SHIFT Program and look at the progress this training has made in the industry.  "Wellness" will be the main focus -- including acknowledging negative effects of chronic exposure to traumatic material and building resiliency to cope with the stress your job entails.  Resources will be provided to help you keep and maintain peak wellness.

3CL
ABCs of Online Child Exploitation Investigations (Part 2 of 3)
Jeff Burlew, Paul Farnstrom and Jennifer Newman
See Session 1CL for description.


3:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

BREAK
Visit Summit Store & Exhibits


3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

4A
Interview & Interrogation: Gaining the Slight Edge
Jon Turbett
See session 2A for description.

4B
Fractures:  Accident or Abuse? A Case-Based Review
Thomas J. Valvano, MD
In this session, Dr. Valvano will review accidental and non-accidental fracture presentations -- using case examples to illustrate the various fracture types and mechanisms associated with accidental and inflicted fractures. Medical disorders associated with increased fracture risk will also be reviewed.  Participants will learn how to recognize fracture patterns associated with abuse. 

4C
Finding Hurt: ALS for Bruising
Jeremy C. Howell
This technical presentation is intended to follow "Finding Trace: Fusing the Forensic Interview with Forensic Evidence" (session 1A).  During this workshop, GBI Agent Howell will expand on the use of an alternate light source (ALS) for bruise detection, bruise enhancement, and bruise pattern recognition.
This presentation will cover how ALS works, how bruises develop, and how ALS can help visualize bruising that may not be visible to the naked eye. The presentation will then cover digital camera settings and equipment necessary for thorough photo-documentation, as well as techniques that may streamline this process with children. 
Law enforcement agencies are often reluctant to invest in this type of equipment due to cost.  This presentation will discuss how to optimize this technique with low-cost equipment and minimal resources.  Research regarding this method of bruise detection and enhancement will also be discussed -- as well as case law that may assist in overcoming the Frye Standard and the Harper Rule for the admissibility of this type of scientific evidence. 
This type of evidence is often overlooked because it may not be seen with the unaided eye.  Don’t let this investigative tool go unused when trying to corroborate the disclosure of physical abuse.
The primary intended audience for this session would be those within the field of law enforcement (specifically those working child abuse and sexual assault cases), along with those who work in the field of social work as Court Appointed Special Advocates and for child protective services and children's advocacy centers (as both family advocates and forensic interviewers). This training would also be beneficial for forensic nurses working in the fields of child abuse and sexual assault. Prosecutors of child abuse and sexual assault cases will learn how this technique of gathering evidence can strengthen a case.
Reference materials will be provided to participants.

4D
Get Ready, He’s Coming Home: Reunification and the Juvenile Sex Offender
Dan Powers, ACSW, LCSW
Many juvenile sex offenders will return home after treatment. Reunification with their family poses many clinical issues for the offender, family and victim. Treatment providers for the offender and victim must work together to make this transition safe and successful.
This workshop will focus on family reunification when the victim is a family member.
Reunification of the victim with their offender is not an issue often faced in the treatment of sexual abuse victims. When the sex offender is a sibling, the dynamic family issues are magnified. Parents are asked by professionals to choose which child they will support. The victim often will be aware of the family’s emotional and financial stress related to the offender’s legal and treatment issue. In addition to the task of healing from their own trauma, victims of sibling sexual abuse are faced with knowing their outcry started the process of their sibling being arrested.
Like the adult sex offender, the process of reunification cannot start until the offender takes responsibility for their actions. The thought of returning home is both an exciting and scary issue for the juvenile sex offender to deal with. A solid treatment model with the goal of reunification and parents heavily involved in the treatment process will lay the foundation. The treatment provider must be in contact and work with the victim’s therapist to ensure clinical continuity and consistent family communication.
Reunification of the family, offender and victim should be approached with great caution. A plan must be set forth with the treatment providers and family to ensure continuity. The treatment providers must ensure emotional and physical safety concerns are addressed. Written protocols allow the treatment provider, family and court a clear picture of the process.
Participants will:
1. Gain a greater understanding of victim issues related to reunification.
2. Gain a greater understanding of reunification issues with juvenile sex offenders.
3. Gain an understanding of the multi-disciplinary team approach to reunification.
4. Be introduced to a treatment model and protocol for reunification of juvenile sex offenders with their families.

4E
When a Family Friend Offers a Modeling Job
Brandon Ott, JoAnn Miller, and Nichole Satterwhite
In this case study, a family friend offers modeling jobs to sisters as a ruse to sexually abuse them.  The child forensic interviewer, detective and assistant district attorney in this case will present how the coordinated MDT response resulted in a successful prosecution. 
Presenters will discuss the dynamics of a victim-perpetrator relationship, the disclosure process and grooming techniques.  Additionally, presenters will demonstrate corroboration of the victims’ statements with evidence -- video, pictures, and physical items from the scene.  Presenters will walk through the evidence collection, trial preparation and jury trial process that was ultimately used to convict the perpetrator.  This presentation will include unique issues faced by the prosecution during trial, and how the state overcame those hurdles.  

4F
Abusive Minds Think Alike (Part 2 of 2)
Kristen Howell, LMSW, and Carrie L. Paschall
See session 3F for description.

4G
Operation Net-Nanny: A Collaborative Attack on Child Sex Trafficking
Carlos Rodriguez
This presentation serves as a guide on how law enforcement can conduct successful online investigations.  Washington's Missing and Exploited Children Task Force (MECTF) has two detectives and no assigned administrative support.  This presentation details how MECTF conducts proactive online investigations to apprehend suspects who exploit children.  
Topics include team-building, initial set-up, logistics, personnel issues, site selection, UC management, investigative techniques, surveillance activities, arrests, and prosecution results.  The presentation includes examples of UC online chats, UC phone conversations, arrests, suspect interview videos, pitfalls to avoid, and identifying areas of improvement.
This session will be repeated Wednesday 12:00 – 1:30 p.m.

4H
Best Practices for Working Commercial Sexual Exploitation Cases:  Law Enforcement and Advocate Collaboration for Successful Interventions (Part 2 of 2)
Esther Nelson, Mike Gallagher, Jason Ritter
See session 3H for description.

4J
Okay.  You Have a Sexual Assault Case. Now What?
Jim Sears
In this session, participants will look at sexual assault investigations and the issues involved with these types of cases.  Taking what society is thinking and what we must know to overcome those “beliefs” will be discussed.  Using up-to-date medical studies, we show what we can get from the medical exam, how important the forensic interview is (and what to take from it), and using the MDT to help in your investigation -- as well as what each part brings to the investigation.

4K
Self-Defense Basics (Part 1 of 2)
Paul Wade and Ashleigh Force
Students will be taught basic but extremely effective skills to counter attacks from every angle -- including ground attacks. The class will be led by certified self-defense instructors Detective Paul Wade and Ashleigh Force.  These skills they will teach are derived from Krav Maga -- the Israeli military fighting technique with a proven combat record -- and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, the premier ground-fighting and ground self-defense art in the world. With these new skills, students will gain the confidence they need to survive instead of being victimized. No prior experience is required, and the class is open to all Summit attendees.
Class limited to 12 participants.  This class will be continued on Wednesday, from 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. There will also be a two-part evening class taught Tuesday, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m., and Wednesday, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m., where participants are encouraged to participate both Tuesday and Wednesday evenings.

4CL
ABCs of Online Child Exploitation Investigations (Part 3 of 3)
Jeff Burlew, Paul Farnstrom and Jennifer Newman
See session 1CL for description.


Social/Fitness Activities

Summit Meet and Greet
5:30 – 7:30 p.m. • Jantzen Beach Bar & Grill
Join your colleagues at the Jantzen Beach Bar & Grill located in the Red Lion as we welcome you to the 19th Annual Summit. Enjoy the casual atmosphere and the majestic view of the Columbia River.
Appetizers, entertainment and a no-host bar will be available.


Summit 5K Fun Run
Sponsored by Bob's Red Mill • 5:30 p.m.
Summit 5k Fun Run Back by popular demand! Join your colleagues for an enjoyable celebration of movement in the 5th Annual Summit 5k Fun Run & Walk! Walk, crawl, roll, or move however you want while enjoying beautiful views of the Columbia River. Sign-ups will be at Registration on Monday, April 16, and in the Lower-Level foyer on Tuesday, April 17, until 3 p.m. Runners/walkers must register to participate. Race begins at 5:30 p.m.


Self-Defense Basics (Part 1 of 2)
Paul Wade and Ashleigh Force
5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Students will be taught basic but extremely effective skills to counter attacks from every angle -- including ground attacks. The class will be led by certified self-defense instructors Detective Paul Wade and Ashleigh Force.  These skills they will teach are derived from Krav Maga -- the Israeli military fighting technique with a proven combat record -- and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, the premier ground-fighting and ground self-defense art in the world. With these new skills, students will gain the confidence they need to survive instead of being victimized. No prior experience is required, and the class is open to all Summit attendees.
Class limited to 12 participants.  This is a two-part class, continuing on Wednesday, April 18, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.  Participants are encouraged to participate both Tuesday and Wednesday evenings.  You will need to sign-up to participate at the Summit Information Table in the Lower Level Foyer of the Red Lion Hotel on the River.

Kristi’s Massage
9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Kristi Ceciliani, local Licensed Massage Therapist, will be on-site outside the ballroom foyer providing chair massages for $1 per minute. Schedule your appointment as soon as you can as her sessions fill quickly. Kristi will also be on-site Wednesday and Thursday, from 9:30 a.m.– 5:00 p.m.

Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting
5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
Lower Level, Pendleton Room


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Northwest SARCon

Sheriff Craig Roberts

Sheriff Craig Roberts

2018 Child Abuse & Family Violence Summit
April 17-20, 2018

Red Lion Hotel on the River
909 N. Hayden Island Drive
Portland, Oregon 97217

Julie Collinson, Conference Coordinator
Phone: 503-557-5827
Fax: 503-785-5037
jcollinson@clackamas.us

Register online