Hope, Healing, and Recovery

One in four people will experience mental health challenges in their lifetime. That means mental health touches every single one of us, be it friends, family or yourself.

It's important to know that having a mental health challenge is part of your whole health package. With the right help, people can and do recover.

Talking about mental health can make people uncomfortable, and misconceptions about mental illness lead to discrimination toward people with anxiety, depression, or other ailments.

This is stigma.

People who experience stigma suffer from a loss of self-esteem, self-efficacy and hope. Stigma keeps people from seeking the help they need when they need it.

We are working hard to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness. We strive to create an environment where people feel comfortable talking about their mental health and where people can seek help with a sense of hope toward feeling better.

We are accepting nominees in the following categories:

  • The Super Heart Ambassador Award recognizes an individual, family or small group who has raised awareness of behavioral health issues, initiated projects with a lasting impact, and/or influenced systems or policy changes.
  • The Super Heart Partner Award recognizes an organization, business or institution that has implemented innovative behavioral health programs and/or policies that positively affect the emotional well being of employees and the greater community.
  • The Super Heart Neighbor Award recognizes a unique individual or family who promotes hope and healing through ordinary acts of kindness and compassion.
  • The Super Heart Employee Award recognizes an exemplary Clackamas County staff member who goes above and beyond, leading with their heart to make a difference in behavioral health.

Take a training

Do you know how to recognize the warning signs of someone in a mental or emotional health crisis? Learn the early warning signs and how to connect a person to resources and support that can help. Sign up for Mental Health First Aid and other trainings by visiting gettrainedtohelp.com.

2019 Super Heart Hero Awards

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and we are honoring local superheroes for their contributions to behavioral health that promote hope, healing and recovery.

Congratulations to this year’s Super Heart Hero Award recipients. Awards will be presented to local heroes on Thursday, May 30.

51991

Recognizes an individual, family or small group who has raised awareness of behavioral health issues, initiated projects with a lasting impact, and/or influenced systems or policy changes.

  • Kyle Laier, Assistant Superintendent Oregon City School District
    Kyle has been a champion for bringing suicide prevention to the Oregon City School District. He spearheaded efforts to get all of the staff trained in first aid for suicide prevention, all principals and counselors trained in advanced suicide prevention. Because of him, all high school students have suicide crisis help lines on their student identification, the district instituted a warm handoff that ensures no kid in distress is left alone until the situation has resolved and there is a district-wide suicide prevention protocol. His commitment to this work has already helped keep kids safe, and will continue to do so. 
  • NAMI Clackamas Peer-to-Peer and Family-to-Family Teachers
    NAMI Peer-to-Peer and Family-to-Family teachers contribute hundreds of hours of their time to help others impacted by mental health concerns. These individuals provide an opportunity for students, many in crisis, to gain information and skills in an environment of mutual support and growth. Their students experience compassion and understanding from people who have similar life experiences. One student said ““NAMI Peer-to-Peer gave me hope when I was close to giving up. I realized that things can and do get better and that my mental health condition doesn’t define me. I learned how to speak up for myself, build a strong support network and make plans for my future. I felt welcome and like I was among friends. Most importantly, I felt heard and understood.”  NAMI teachers let our community know that recovery is a journey, and there is hope. I am in awe of the commitment and dedication this amazing group of people have, sharing their strength oft times when facing crisis themselves.     
51991

Recognizes an organization, business or institution that has implemented innovative behavioral health programs and/or policies that positively affect the emotional well being of employees and the greater community.

  • Kirsten Rian, Clackamas County Arts Alliance
    The Arts Alliance shared their skills, passion, and belief in the power of art to make the Ask The Question (ATQ) photo project a success. The ATQ project brought artists, community members, suicide survivors and their supports together to challenge the stigma around suicide survivors/thrivers and promote a message of healing. With the Clackamas County Arts Alliance’s partnership, the Ask the Question project traveled around Clackamas County, sharing stories of hope and building community.
  • Megan Trihey and Orion Ludlow, KATU News Portland 
    KATU reached out to Clackamas County in early 2018 in what began an incredible partnership of talking about suicide prevention through a lens of hope and recovery. They consistently cover this significant public health issue with integrity, collaboration, safe reporting and in ways that other media outlets are not consistently doing. KATU has chosen not to sensationalize death from suicide but, instead, use their coverage to educate, inform, and infuse messages of hope, recovery and connection. We are incredibly fortunate to have them as a partner in this work.
51991

Recognizes a unique individual or family who promotes hope and healing through ordinary acts of kindness and compassion.

  • Ann Shelly- Bournes, Eagles wings Ministries
    Ann has helped numerous homeless people with food clothing and counseling. She has housed a mother and child who were living in a motel. She is always willing to help anyone with a smile and positive words.
  • Kayoni M Winfree, Kayoni Winfree
    Kayoni opens her home to kids in foster care. She is a single mom, but wants to help hurting kids to change the path they are on from being in a hopeless situation into a life of hope.
51991

Recognizes an exemplary Clackamas County staff member who goes above and beyond, leading with their heart to make a difference in behavioral health.

  • Erin Carkner, Rex Putnam SBHC
    Erin works with the high school students at Rex Putnam as the Behavior Health Counselor. High school age kids cans be challenging to work with, but Erin is amazing at making them feel comfortable and cared for. She has made such a big difference in her client’s lives. 
  • Stephanie Jefferson, Clackamas MHC
    Stephanie works tirelessly to support individuals in the community living with a mental illness.  She advocates for her clients, and is compassionate, intentional and thorough. She connects with the individuals she serves and meets them where they are at.
51991
Contact Us
Department Staff
Nina Danielsen
Health Promotion Coordinator
503-742-5309
Galli Murray
Youth Suicide Prevention Coordinator 
503-742-5373
Kathy Turner
Regional Promotion and Prevention Coordinator
503-742-5962

Office Hours:

24-7 crisis and support line 503-655-8585

Call to schedule services 503-742-5335
Monday - Thursday 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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