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Frequently Asked Questions

More questions and answers are available on the Oregon Health Authority website.

Physical Distancing

68831

In response to the alarming rise in COVID-19 case counts across Oregon over the last several weeks, Governor Kate Brown has announced new requirements for face coverings and limits on social get-togethers. Effective Wednesday, July 15, Oregon’s face covering requirement will be expanded to apply to outdoor public spaces when six feet of distance cannot be maintained. In addition, indoor social get-togethers of more than 10 people will be prohibited.

68831

It’s understandable that people want to get out and more around more as restrictions start to ease and summer weather arrives. It’s important that we continue to do so safely:

  • Many Clackamas County Parks and North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District have opened.
  • Parks that are open may have limited facilities, so bring your own soap, water, hand sanitizer and other hygiene products.
  • Physical distancing is still vital, so it’s important to avoid crowded areas and only visit places where you can maintain 6 feet of distance between yourself and others.
  • City parks operate under their own set of guidelines, check with the individual city to see if the park is open.
  • Check the Oregon State Parks status map to see which parks are open.
  • Face coverings will be required outside when physical distance can't be maintained starting July 15.
68831

Public pools were not covered under Phase 1 reopening. There has not been guidance released yet for Phase 2. The only facilities exempted from the Governor’s orders are therapy pools. 

68831

In response to the alarming rise in COVID-19 case counts across Oregon over the last several weeks, Governor Kate Brown announced new requirements for face coverings and limits on social get-togethers. Effective Wednesday, July 15, Oregon’s face covering requirement will be expanded to apply to outdoor public spaces when six feet of distance cannot be maintained. In addition, indoor social get-togethers of more than 10 people will be prohibited.

68831

County services are available online to protect your health. Some county offices will be opening to the public with additional safety measures in place. Please contact the department to check if they are open.

68831

There is now. Oregon OSHA will begin systematically performing spot checks to verify that employers are complying with requirements — including closures to the public — aimed at flattening the curve of the pandemic. 

68831

Donating blood is considered an essential service. Keep your appointment or schedule one at RedCrossBlood.org.

68831

You can exercise outside as long as you stay 6 feet away from others. You can still walk your dog, jog, and bike in your neighborhood.

68831

At this time Governor Brown has not issued an end date for the “Stay at Home” order.

68831

While the order prohibits the public from congregating at a closed business, the employer may still have work to do on-site. As long as employees are not conducting business that is prohibited by the Executive Order, it is okay to still be at the worksite. No “passes” or paperwork is required.

68831

Yes, generally. Some rest areas are connected to parks, which may be closed to comply with the Executive Order.

68831

People that violate the Governor’s Order in an Emergency Declaration could be arrested or cited, which is a C Misdemeanor — the lowest level of criminal conduct designation. All Oregon law enforcement are united on the premise that police action is extremely undesirable and we hope to educate Oregonians if congregating in violation of the Governor’s Order. Citation or arrest would be an extreme last resort if a person failed to comply with the lawful direction of a police officer.

68831

Police know our children don’t often take their parent’s advice and may ignore direction when away. Like adults found to be congregating in a location, officers will likely approach the youths and educate them on the order. Citations and arrests are extremely unlikely, reserved for only the most extreme circumstances.

68831

Yes. Oregonians can still recreate outdoors, if their recreational activity involves non-contact with others and they can maintain appropriate social distancing — which is defined as 6 feet or more from others. Oregonians and visitors to our state should be aware that many campgrounds and boat ramps are closed, so you should research your plans before recreating.

68831

No. The level of this violation is not for reporting police, fire or medical emergencies through 911. People may choose to self-educate their fellow Oregonians or if a large gathering is noted, they may call their respective police agency’s non-emergency number.

68831

Price gouging — the practice of charging extra high prices for essential items in times of high-demand — is prohibited during times of crisis.

We are cautioning all Clackamas County residents to be aware of unusually high prices for consumer goods like hand sanitizer, vitamins, toilet paper and other consumer goods due to COVID-19. The county’s latest update to the emergency declaration prohibits price gouging for goods and services.

If you see price gouging in Oregon, please call the state’s Consumer Protection Hotline at 1-877-9392 .

When it comes to online marketplaces, you may need to report price gouging directly to the selling platform. Oregon’s attorney general was one of 33 who co-wrote letters to Amazon, Walmart, eBay, Facebook and Craigslist on March 25 asking them to crack down on overpriced items.

More resources: 

68941

Please be aware that there are scams out there preying on people’s fear of COVID-19. Please do not trust anyone calling or emailing you asking for your personal information. There have been reports of:

  • Individuals and businesses selling fake cures for COVID-19 online and engaging in other forms of fraud.
  • Phishing emails from entities posing as the World Health Organization or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Malicious websites and apps that appear to share virus-related information to gain and lock access to your devices until payment is received.
  • Seeking donations fraudulently for illegitimate or non-existent charitable organizations.

Criminals will likely continue to use new methods to exploit COVID-19 worldwide.  If you think you are a victim of a scam or attempted fraud involving COVID-19, you can report it without leaving your home.

68941

No! We want to remind everyone that a person’s ethnicity, language or association with a country or region does not mean they carry this virus. As long as they have not recently spent time in an area where COVID-19 has spread, or have not been in close contact with an individual with a suspected or confirmed case of the virus, they are at no greater risk of carrying or spreading COVID-19 than anyone else.

Stigmatizing certain groups based on rumors, false information and discrimination creates unnecessary fear and anxiety, hurting the whole community. In times of fear, we urge common sense and respect. In times of unknowns, we urge people to spread facts, not fear.

In addition, any discrimination incident that may be motivated by another person’s race, color, disability, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or gender identity is considered a hate and bias incident. If you witness or experience this kind of discrimination, please report it to the Oregon Department of Justice online or by calling 1-844-924-BIAS (2427) so the Oregon Department of Justice can track the incident. For emergency assistance, dial 911.

68941

Currently, there is no evidence of transmission of COVID-19 from imported goods.

Generally, coronaviruses do not survive well on surfaces so the risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks is thought to be extremely low. Coronaviruses are spread most often by small droplets of mucus from the nose and throat.

68941

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has become aware that members of the general public are receiving calls appearing to originate from CDC through caller ID, or they are receiving scammer voice mail messages saying the caller is from the CDC. Some calls are requesting donations.

Protect Yourself

Be wary of answering phone calls from numbers you do not recognize. Federal agencies do not request donations from the general public. Do not give out your personal information, including banking information, Social Security number or other personally identifiable information over the phone or to individuals you do not know.

68941

Malicious cyber criminals are also attempting to leverage interest and activity in COVID-19 to launch coronavirus-themed phishing emails. These phishing emails contain links and downloads for malware that can allow them to takeover healthcare IT systems and steal information.

Protect Yourself: 

Stay vigilant and follow good security practices:

  • Don’t open unsolicited email from people you don’t know.
  • Be wary of third-party sources spreading information about COVID-19. Refer to the official CDC gov website for updates on COVID-19.
  • Hover your mouse over links to see where they lead.
  • Do not click links in emails. If you think the address is correct, retype it in a browser window.
  • Be wary of attachments in any email.
  • Do not supply any personal information, especially passwords, to anyone via email.
68941

Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low. The CDC has useful information about pets and coronavirus

67761

Limit contact with your pet and wash your hands before and after you touch them. We understand this may be very hard on both you and your pet. When you are kissing, snuggling or touching your pet, you may leave germs on the pet that could then be picked up by another person. If possible, a healthy household member should care for the pet while the sick person avoids contact.

67761

Price gouging, scams and discrimination

68941

In response to the alarming rise in COVID-19 case counts across Oregon over the last several weeks, Governor Kate Brown has announced new requirements for face coverings and limits on social get-togethers. Effective Wednesday, July 15, Oregon’s face covering requirement will be expanded to apply to outdoor public spaces when six feet of distance cannot be maintained. In addition, indoor social get-togethers of more than 10 people will be prohibited.

68831

It’s understandable that people want to get out and more around more as restrictions start to ease and summer weather arrives. It’s important that we continue to do so safely:

  • Many Clackamas County Parks and North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District have opened.
  • Parks that are open may have limited facilities, so bring your own soap, water, hand sanitizer and other hygiene products.
  • Physical distancing is still vital, so it’s important to avoid crowded areas and only visit places where you can maintain 6 feet of distance between yourself and others.
  • City parks operate under their own set of guidelines, check with the individual city to see if the park is open.
  • Check the Oregon State Parks status map to see which parks are open.
  • Face coverings will be required outside when physical distance can't be maintained starting July 15.
68831

Public pools were not covered under Phase 1 reopening. There has not been guidance released yet for Phase 2. The only facilities exempted from the Governor’s orders are therapy pools. 

68831

In response to the alarming rise in COVID-19 case counts across Oregon over the last several weeks, Governor Kate Brown announced new requirements for face coverings and limits on social get-togethers. Effective Wednesday, July 15, Oregon’s face covering requirement will be expanded to apply to outdoor public spaces when six feet of distance cannot be maintained. In addition, indoor social get-togethers of more than 10 people will be prohibited.

68831

County services are available online to protect your health. Some county offices will be opening to the public with additional safety measures in place. Please contact the department to check if they are open.

68831

There is now. Oregon OSHA will begin systematically performing spot checks to verify that employers are complying with requirements — including closures to the public — aimed at flattening the curve of the pandemic. 

68831

Donating blood is considered an essential service. Keep your appointment or schedule one at RedCrossBlood.org.

68831

You can exercise outside as long as you stay 6 feet away from others. You can still walk your dog, jog, and bike in your neighborhood.

68831

At this time Governor Brown has not issued an end date for the “Stay at Home” order.

68831

While the order prohibits the public from congregating at a closed business, the employer may still have work to do on-site. As long as employees are not conducting business that is prohibited by the Executive Order, it is okay to still be at the worksite. No “passes” or paperwork is required.

68831

Yes, generally. Some rest areas are connected to parks, which may be closed to comply with the Executive Order.

68831

People that violate the Governor’s Order in an Emergency Declaration could be arrested or cited, which is a C Misdemeanor — the lowest level of criminal conduct designation. All Oregon law enforcement are united on the premise that police action is extremely undesirable and we hope to educate Oregonians if congregating in violation of the Governor’s Order. Citation or arrest would be an extreme last resort if a person failed to comply with the lawful direction of a police officer.

68831

Police know our children don’t often take their parent’s advice and may ignore direction when away. Like adults found to be congregating in a location, officers will likely approach the youths and educate them on the order. Citations and arrests are extremely unlikely, reserved for only the most extreme circumstances.

68831

Yes. Oregonians can still recreate outdoors, if their recreational activity involves non-contact with others and they can maintain appropriate social distancing — which is defined as 6 feet or more from others. Oregonians and visitors to our state should be aware that many campgrounds and boat ramps are closed, so you should research your plans before recreating.

68831

No. The level of this violation is not for reporting police, fire or medical emergencies through 911. People may choose to self-educate their fellow Oregonians or if a large gathering is noted, they may call their respective police agency’s non-emergency number.

68831

Price gouging — the practice of charging extra high prices for essential items in times of high-demand — is prohibited during times of crisis.

We are cautioning all Clackamas County residents to be aware of unusually high prices for consumer goods like hand sanitizer, vitamins, toilet paper and other consumer goods due to COVID-19. The county’s latest update to the emergency declaration prohibits price gouging for goods and services.

If you see price gouging in Oregon, please call the state’s Consumer Protection Hotline at 1-877-9392 .

When it comes to online marketplaces, you may need to report price gouging directly to the selling platform. Oregon’s attorney general was one of 33 who co-wrote letters to Amazon, Walmart, eBay, Facebook and Craigslist on March 25 asking them to crack down on overpriced items.

More resources: 

68941

Please be aware that there are scams out there preying on people’s fear of COVID-19. Please do not trust anyone calling or emailing you asking for your personal information. There have been reports of:

  • Individuals and businesses selling fake cures for COVID-19 online and engaging in other forms of fraud.
  • Phishing emails from entities posing as the World Health Organization or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Malicious websites and apps that appear to share virus-related information to gain and lock access to your devices until payment is received.
  • Seeking donations fraudulently for illegitimate or non-existent charitable organizations.

Criminals will likely continue to use new methods to exploit COVID-19 worldwide.  If you think you are a victim of a scam or attempted fraud involving COVID-19, you can report it without leaving your home.

68941

No! We want to remind everyone that a person’s ethnicity, language or association with a country or region does not mean they carry this virus. As long as they have not recently spent time in an area where COVID-19 has spread, or have not been in close contact with an individual with a suspected or confirmed case of the virus, they are at no greater risk of carrying or spreading COVID-19 than anyone else.

Stigmatizing certain groups based on rumors, false information and discrimination creates unnecessary fear and anxiety, hurting the whole community. In times of fear, we urge common sense and respect. In times of unknowns, we urge people to spread facts, not fear.

In addition, any discrimination incident that may be motivated by another person’s race, color, disability, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or gender identity is considered a hate and bias incident. If you witness or experience this kind of discrimination, please report it to the Oregon Department of Justice online or by calling 1-844-924-BIAS (2427) so the Oregon Department of Justice can track the incident. For emergency assistance, dial 911.

68941

Currently, there is no evidence of transmission of COVID-19 from imported goods.

Generally, coronaviruses do not survive well on surfaces so the risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks is thought to be extremely low. Coronaviruses are spread most often by small droplets of mucus from the nose and throat.

68941

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has become aware that members of the general public are receiving calls appearing to originate from CDC through caller ID, or they are receiving scammer voice mail messages saying the caller is from the CDC. Some calls are requesting donations.

Protect Yourself

Be wary of answering phone calls from numbers you do not recognize. Federal agencies do not request donations from the general public. Do not give out your personal information, including banking information, Social Security number or other personally identifiable information over the phone or to individuals you do not know.

68941

Malicious cyber criminals are also attempting to leverage interest and activity in COVID-19 to launch coronavirus-themed phishing emails. These phishing emails contain links and downloads for malware that can allow them to takeover healthcare IT systems and steal information.

Protect Yourself: 

Stay vigilant and follow good security practices:

  • Don’t open unsolicited email from people you don’t know.
  • Be wary of third-party sources spreading information about COVID-19. Refer to the official CDC gov website for updates on COVID-19.
  • Hover your mouse over links to see where they lead.
  • Do not click links in emails. If you think the address is correct, retype it in a browser window.
  • Be wary of attachments in any email.
  • Do not supply any personal information, especially passwords, to anyone via email.
68941

Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low. The CDC has useful information about pets and coronavirus

67761

Limit contact with your pet and wash your hands before and after you touch them. We understand this may be very hard on both you and your pet. When you are kissing, snuggling or touching your pet, you may leave germs on the pet that could then be picked up by another person. If possible, a healthy household member should care for the pet while the sick person avoids contact.

67761

Pets

67761

In response to the alarming rise in COVID-19 case counts across Oregon over the last several weeks, Governor Kate Brown has announced new requirements for face coverings and limits on social get-togethers. Effective Wednesday, July 15, Oregon’s face covering requirement will be expanded to apply to outdoor public spaces when six feet of distance cannot be maintained. In addition, indoor social get-togethers of more than 10 people will be prohibited.

68831

It’s understandable that people want to get out and more around more as restrictions start to ease and summer weather arrives. It’s important that we continue to do so safely:

  • Many Clackamas County Parks and North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District have opened.
  • Parks that are open may have limited facilities, so bring your own soap, water, hand sanitizer and other hygiene products.
  • Physical distancing is still vital, so it’s important to avoid crowded areas and only visit places where you can maintain 6 feet of distance between yourself and others.
  • City parks operate under their own set of guidelines, check with the individual city to see if the park is open.
  • Check the Oregon State Parks status map to see which parks are open.
  • Face coverings will be required outside when physical distance can't be maintained starting July 15.
68831

Public pools were not covered under Phase 1 reopening. There has not been guidance released yet for Phase 2. The only facilities exempted from the Governor’s orders are therapy pools. 

68831

In response to the alarming rise in COVID-19 case counts across Oregon over the last several weeks, Governor Kate Brown announced new requirements for face coverings and limits on social get-togethers. Effective Wednesday, July 15, Oregon’s face covering requirement will be expanded to apply to outdoor public spaces when six feet of distance cannot be maintained. In addition, indoor social get-togethers of more than 10 people will be prohibited.

68831

County services are available online to protect your health. Some county offices will be opening to the public with additional safety measures in place. Please contact the department to check if they are open.

68831

There is now. Oregon OSHA will begin systematically performing spot checks to verify that employers are complying with requirements — including closures to the public — aimed at flattening the curve of the pandemic. 

68831

Donating blood is considered an essential service. Keep your appointment or schedule one at RedCrossBlood.org.

68831

You can exercise outside as long as you stay 6 feet away from others. You can still walk your dog, jog, and bike in your neighborhood.

68831

At this time Governor Brown has not issued an end date for the “Stay at Home” order.

68831

While the order prohibits the public from congregating at a closed business, the employer may still have work to do on-site. As long as employees are not conducting business that is prohibited by the Executive Order, it is okay to still be at the worksite. No “passes” or paperwork is required.

68831

Yes, generally. Some rest areas are connected to parks, which may be closed to comply with the Executive Order.

68831

People that violate the Governor’s Order in an Emergency Declaration could be arrested or cited, which is a C Misdemeanor — the lowest level of criminal conduct designation. All Oregon law enforcement are united on the premise that police action is extremely undesirable and we hope to educate Oregonians if congregating in violation of the Governor’s Order. Citation or arrest would be an extreme last resort if a person failed to comply with the lawful direction of a police officer.

68831

Police know our children don’t often take their parent’s advice and may ignore direction when away. Like adults found to be congregating in a location, officers will likely approach the youths and educate them on the order. Citations and arrests are extremely unlikely, reserved for only the most extreme circumstances.

68831

Yes. Oregonians can still recreate outdoors, if their recreational activity involves non-contact with others and they can maintain appropriate social distancing — which is defined as 6 feet or more from others. Oregonians and visitors to our state should be aware that many campgrounds and boat ramps are closed, so you should research your plans before recreating.

68831

No. The level of this violation is not for reporting police, fire or medical emergencies through 911. People may choose to self-educate their fellow Oregonians or if a large gathering is noted, they may call their respective police agency’s non-emergency number.

68831

Price gouging — the practice of charging extra high prices for essential items in times of high-demand — is prohibited during times of crisis.

We are cautioning all Clackamas County residents to be aware of unusually high prices for consumer goods like hand sanitizer, vitamins, toilet paper and other consumer goods due to COVID-19. The county’s latest update to the emergency declaration prohibits price gouging for goods and services.

If you see price gouging in Oregon, please call the state’s Consumer Protection Hotline at 1-877-9392 .

When it comes to online marketplaces, you may need to report price gouging directly to the selling platform. Oregon’s attorney general was one of 33 who co-wrote letters to Amazon, Walmart, eBay, Facebook and Craigslist on March 25 asking them to crack down on overpriced items.

More resources: 

68941

Please be aware that there are scams out there preying on people’s fear of COVID-19. Please do not trust anyone calling or emailing you asking for your personal information. There have been reports of:

  • Individuals and businesses selling fake cures for COVID-19 online and engaging in other forms of fraud.
  • Phishing emails from entities posing as the World Health Organization or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Malicious websites and apps that appear to share virus-related information to gain and lock access to your devices until payment is received.
  • Seeking donations fraudulently for illegitimate or non-existent charitable organizations.

Criminals will likely continue to use new methods to exploit COVID-19 worldwide.  If you think you are a victim of a scam or attempted fraud involving COVID-19, you can report it without leaving your home.

68941

No! We want to remind everyone that a person’s ethnicity, language or association with a country or region does not mean they carry this virus. As long as they have not recently spent time in an area where COVID-19 has spread, or have not been in close contact with an individual with a suspected or confirmed case of the virus, they are at no greater risk of carrying or spreading COVID-19 than anyone else.

Stigmatizing certain groups based on rumors, false information and discrimination creates unnecessary fear and anxiety, hurting the whole community. In times of fear, we urge common sense and respect. In times of unknowns, we urge people to spread facts, not fear.

In addition, any discrimination incident that may be motivated by another person’s race, color, disability, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or gender identity is considered a hate and bias incident. If you witness or experience this kind of discrimination, please report it to the Oregon Department of Justice online or by calling 1-844-924-BIAS (2427) so the Oregon Department of Justice can track the incident. For emergency assistance, dial 911.

68941

Currently, there is no evidence of transmission of COVID-19 from imported goods.

Generally, coronaviruses do not survive well on surfaces so the risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks is thought to be extremely low. Coronaviruses are spread most often by small droplets of mucus from the nose and throat.

68941

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has become aware that members of the general public are receiving calls appearing to originate from CDC through caller ID, or they are receiving scammer voice mail messages saying the caller is from the CDC. Some calls are requesting donations.

Protect Yourself

Be wary of answering phone calls from numbers you do not recognize. Federal agencies do not request donations from the general public. Do not give out your personal information, including banking information, Social Security number or other personally identifiable information over the phone or to individuals you do not know.

68941

Malicious cyber criminals are also attempting to leverage interest and activity in COVID-19 to launch coronavirus-themed phishing emails. These phishing emails contain links and downloads for malware that can allow them to takeover healthcare IT systems and steal information.

Protect Yourself: 

Stay vigilant and follow good security practices:

  • Don’t open unsolicited email from people you don’t know.
  • Be wary of third-party sources spreading information about COVID-19. Refer to the official CDC gov website for updates on COVID-19.
  • Hover your mouse over links to see where they lead.
  • Do not click links in emails. If you think the address is correct, retype it in a browser window.
  • Be wary of attachments in any email.
  • Do not supply any personal information, especially passwords, to anyone via email.
68941

Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low. The CDC has useful information about pets and coronavirus

67761

Limit contact with your pet and wash your hands before and after you touch them. We understand this may be very hard on both you and your pet. When you are kissing, snuggling or touching your pet, you may leave germs on the pet that could then be picked up by another person. If possible, a healthy household member should care for the pet while the sick person avoids contact.

67761

Office Hours:

Clackamas County Call Center
503-655-8224
Monday to Thursday
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Regional Information
2-1-1

Clackamas County Crisis and Support Line
503-655-8585

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1-800-273-TALK