Getting Tested

Knowing you have COVID-19 is important so you can take care of yourself and prevent the spread of the virus.

If you have symptoms and think you might have COVID-19, you can ask your health care provider to be tested or you can find a COVID-19 testing site in your community.

If you’re not feeling well, consider using the Coronavirus Checker. This tool allows people to check their symptoms, and if warranted, directs them to the appropriate hospital or clinic.

Your health care provider may decide to have you tested for other illnesses, like the flu, based on your symptoms and possible exposure history.

If you are not vaccinated and have been exposed to COVID-19, testing is still recommended.

Avoiding Counterfeit COVID-19 At-Home Test Kits – 5/18/22

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified that counterfeit versions of Flowflex COVID-19 Test Kits and iHealth COVID-19 Antigen Rapid Test Kits are being circulated in the U.S. Information on how to identify these counterfeit tests are available on the FDA’s website as well as included in the graphic below. The iHealth test kits distributed by Clackamas County Public Health and provided by Oregon Health Authority are not in danger of being counterfeit as they were obtained directly from the manufacturer.

Tips for avoiding counterfeit at-home COVID tests

Counterfeit COVID-19 tests in Spanish

Expiration Date Extension to the iHealth COVID-19 Antigen Rapid Tests - 4/14/2022

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted an expiration date extension to the iHealth COVID-19 Antigen Rapid Test. Tests with a printed expiration date on or before 2022-09-29 now have a 9-month shelf life if properly stored between 36—86°F. This means that the expiration date printed on the back of the test kit box is now extended by 3 months. For example, if the expiration or use by date for a kit reads 2022-06-27, it is now approved for use until 2022-09-27 if properly stored. iHealth Labs has created an expiration date checker available on its website.

You can feel confident continuing to use these tests. Expiration date extensions for these types of products are only granted after studies are performed and submitted for review by the FDA. The approval letter released by the FDA is available here, and you can learn more about the extension of expiration dates on the FDA’s website.

No-Cost Testing Sites

Clackamas Community College Harmony Campus
7740 SE Harmony Road, Milwaukie

PCR Tests (results in 48–72 hrs.)
Mon - Fri, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat, 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Rapid Molecular Tests (results in 2 hrs.)
Mon - Fri, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Sat, 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Appointments available online or by phone. Testing availability without an appointment is limited and not guaranteed. Please take identification with you to your appointment. Visitors with healthcare coverage must provide insurance card and identification.
Non-English language support is available
www.curative.com
Phone: 888-702-9042

Clackamas Town Center Mall Drive-Thru Site
SE Monterey and SE 82nd

Mon - Fri, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Appointments not required
No cost for non-travel PCR testing Photo ID required
Spanish-speakers available
www.covidclinic.org/happy-valley-or/
Phone: 877-219-8378

Neighborhood Health Centers
Oregon City and Canby

Appointment required
Molecular testing available
www.nhcoregon.org

Walgreens and Rite Aid Pharmacies
County-wide

Molecular testing (Rite Aid, ages 4+)
Molecular and rapid antigen testing (Walgreens, ages 3+)
Appointment required

After You Get Tested

After Testing Guide

COVID-19: After You Get Tested provides a wealth of information about what to do if you have received a positive test result or are waiting for your results.

If you have trouble breathing or feel very ill, contact your health care provider or, in case of emergency, call 911.

COVID-19 Support Hotline and Website

The Oregon Health Authority has launched a hotline and website to support people who have tested positive for COVID-19. Callers and site visitors can report their case and learn how to keep themselves and others safe while they recover.

  • COVID-19 Case Support Hotline: 866-917-8881, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturdays

What To Do If You Test Positive

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 What To Do If You Test Positive guide explains what to do if you test positive or if you have symptoms of COVID-19.

  • Information on isolation
  • Help knowing when to start and end each
  • Resources and services for those who have to isolate
  • When and how to tell close contacts and employers
  • Contact information for regional public health help

Are the tests accurate?

COVID-19 tests are effective at detecting a COVID-19 infection, and two types of tests are typically used:

  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are molecular tests that are highly accurate when properly performed by a healthcare professional. Results from these tests usually take a couple of days, but rapid versions are available that offer results in an hour or less.
  • Antigen tests — sometimes simply called rapid tests — detect certain proteins in the virus in as little as 15 minutes. These tests are often used by employers, entertainment venues, and college campuses to help control the spread of COVID-19, and they are also available at local and online retailers for at-home use. A positive antigen test result is considered accurate when instructions are carefully followed. However, these tests can sometimes produce false negatives. If you receive a negative result but are experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should contact your healthcare provider and consider getting a PCR test (and, in the meantime, wear a mask, wash your hands frequently and avoid close contact with others). For additional guidance about at-home antigen tests, see the Center for Disease Control’s website.   

Frequently Asked Questions

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COVID-19 tests are effective at detecting a COVID-19 infection, and two types of tests are typically used:

  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are molecular tests that are highly accurate when properly performed by a healthcare professional. Results from these tests usually take a couple of days, but rapid versions are available that offer results in an hour or less.
  • Antigen tests — sometimes simply called rapid tests — detect certain proteins in the virus in as little as 15 minutes. These tests are often used by employers, entertainment venues, and college campuses to help control the spread of COVID-19, and they are also available at local and online retailers for at-home use. A positive antigen test result is considered accurate when instructions are carefully followed. However, these tests can sometimes produce false negatives. If you receive a negative result but are experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should contact your healthcare provider and consider getting a PCR test (and, in the meantime, wear a mask, wash your hands frequently and avoid close contact with others). For additional guidance about at-home antigen tests, see the Center for Disease Control’s website.   
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There are options if you don’t have insurance or can’t afford a COVID-19 test:

  • Locate a no-cost test site via the resources on this page under “Testing Locations”.
  • Order free at-home tests from covidtests.gov (as of March 2022, every household can order 4 free test kits).
  • You may be eligible for Oregon Health Plan coverage, under which you can access no-cost testing. For more information, call the Clackamas County Health Centers at 503-655-8471.
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  • Stay at home except to get medical care. Isolate yourself from others in the household for at least 5 days.
    • If you have no symptoms and feel well, or your symptoms are much better after 5 days, you can leave your house.
    • Wear a well-fitting mask around others for 5 additional days.
    • If you have a fever, continue to stay home until you don’t have a fever.
    • If you need support to isolate, call your Community Health Worker.
  • Watch for symptoms and seek medical care if you feel worried or if your symptoms get worse.
  • Tell your close contacts and household members you have tested positive. (A close contact is anyone you were within 6 feet of for 15 minutes or longer since 2 days before your symptoms began or 2 days before you took your test.)
    • If they are not up to date on their vaccinations, they should follow quarantine guidelines and stay home for at least 5 days. If they can, they should get tested on day 5 after their exposure to you.
    • If they are up to date on their vaccinations, they do not need to quarantine, but should wear a mask when in public and watch for symptoms for 10 days.
  • Call your healthcare provider as soon as possible. There may be treatment available, but some treatment depends on acting quickly. If you don’t have a healthcare provider, call 211 for help finding one.

You are up to date on your vaccination if you:

Have been boosted OR have completed your vaccine doses of Pfizer within the last 5 months OR Moderna within the last 5 months OR J&J within the last 2 months.

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It varies depending on the type of test and which laboratory was used. Ask your testing provider for more information. While waiting for results, isolate yourself to limit the possible spread of the virus and be sure to wear a mask if you need to be around others.

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We do not support requiring proof of negative COVID-19 test results as a condition of returning to work.

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Office Hours:

Tested positive or were exposed to COVID‑19?
The trained professionals at the Oregon Health Authority can help.
Hours Monday through Friday
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
866-917-8881

Vaccine questions?
COVIDVaccine@clackamas.us

Regional Information
2-1-1

Clackamas County Crisis and Support Line
503-655-8585

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1-800-273-TALK