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Canby Rodeo

Join us during the week of the fair, Aug. 18 through 22

The sport of rodeo offers a window into America's rich rural ranching past, and event test the skill and speed of the athletes who participate. Professional rodeos often include events like tie-down roping, team roping, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, bull riding, and barrel racing. A Clackamas tradition since 1958, the rodeo began in Clackamas after Canby resident Craig Landeen and the fair board created the event as an attraction to boost attendance to the Fair.

Are you interested in volunteering with the Canby Rodeo? Or would you like to apply to be a Rodeo Associate? Send us an email at Rhodescj@canby.com to request more information!

Tickets

Tickets may be purchased in advance online. If you need ADA accessible seating, please call the Event Center office at 503-266-1136 to purchase them.

Pricing

Rodeo admission tickets require the purchase of Fair admission tickets.

Reserved Grandstand (covered) Sections AA, BB, CC, DD & Handicap Seating plus fair admission $20
General Admission Bleachers Sections A, B, C, D, & E plus fair admission 17
Bull Pen (21+) Seating plus fair admission 22

Rodeo Sponsors

Thank you to our generous sponsors for supporting the Clackamas County Rodeo!

Click on the logos to visit our sponsors' websites.

Exclusive Sponsors

Diamond Plus

Rodeo Events

Photos courtesy of Alex Tam of the Canby Herald

Bareback riding

Bareback Riding

The bareback bronc rider does not use a saddle or rein, but uses one hand to grip a simple handle on a surcingle style rigging placed on the horse, just at the horse's withers. The rider leans back against the bucking horse and spurs in an up and down motion with his legs, in rhythm with the motion of the horse.

Originally based on the necessary horse breaking skills of a working cowboy. The event is now a highly stylized competition that utilizes horses that often are specifically bred for strength, agility, and bucking ability.

On the first jump out of the chute, the rider must "mark the horse out". This means he must have the heels of his boots in contact with the horse above the point of the shoulders before the horse's front legs hit the ground. The rider that manages to complete a ride is scored on a scale of 0-50 and the horse is also scored on a scale of 0-50. Scores in the 80s are very good, and in the 90s, are exceptional.  A horse who bucks in a spectacular and effective manner will score more points than a horse who bucks in a straight line with no significant changes of direction.

Barrel Racing

Barrel Racing

A horse and rider attempt to complete a pattern around pre-set barrels in the fastest time. Though both girls and boys compete at the youth level, and men compete in some amateur venues, in collegiate and professional ranks, it is primarily a rodeo event for women. It combines the horse's athletic ability and the horsemanship skills of a rider in order to safely and successfully maneuver a horse through a clover leaf pattern around three barrels. These are typically three fifty-five gallon metal or plastic drums placed in a triangle in the center of an arena.

Bull Riding

Bull Riding

A rider mounts a bull and grips a flat braided rope. After he secures a good grip on the rope, the rider nods to signal he is ready. The bucking chute is opened and the rider must attempt to stay on the bull for at least eight seconds, while only touching the bull with his riding hand. His other hand must remain free for the duration of the ride.

Bullfighters, also popularly known as rodeo clowns, stay near the bull in order to aid the rider if necessary. When the ride ends, either intentionally or not, the bullfighters distract the bull to protect the rider from harm.

Saddle Bronc

Saddle Bronc

In saddle bronc, the rider uses a specialized saddle with free swinging stirrups and no horn. The saddle bronc rider grips a simple rein braided from cotton or polyester and attached to a leather halter worn by the horse. The rider lifts on the rein and attempts to find a rhythm with the animal by spurring forwards and backwards with his feet. The rider must "mark out" (position the spurs over the horse's shoulders) until after the first jump to give the horse the advantage. The rider's spurs have no sharp edges, and the more the contestant spurs the horse, the higher the score. The rider is scored by judges for skill and technique, and the horse is scored for difficulty.

Steer Wrestling

Steer Wrestling

This event is also known as Bulldogging. When the steer wrestler is ready, he calls for the steer and the chute man trips a lever, opening the doors. The suddenly freed steer breaks off and simultaneously releases the barrier for the steer wrestler. The steer wrestler attempts to catch up to the running steer, lean over the side of the horse and grab the horns of the running steer. The steer wrestler then is pulled off his horse by the slowing steer and plants his heels into the dirt slowing the steer and himself. He then takes one hand off the horns, reaches down and grabs the nose of the steer, pulling the steer off balance and ultimately throwing the steer to the ground. Once all four legs are off the ground, an official waves a flag marking the official end and a time is taken. The steer is released and trots off.

Typical professional times will be in the range of 3.5 to 10 seconds from the gates opening to the waving of the flag.

team roping

Team Roping

This event is also known as Heading and Heeling. A two-person team competes. The first roper is referred to as the "header" (the person who ropes the front of the steer, usually around the horns), and the second roper is the "heeler", who ropes the steer by its hind feet. Team roping is the only rodeo event where men and women compete equally together in professionally sanctioned competition.

tie down roping

Tie-Down Roping

The rider must lasso the calf from horseback by throwing a loop of the lariat around the calf's neck. Once the rope is around the calf's neck, the roper signals the horse to stop quickly while he dismounts and runs to the calf. The calf must be stopped by the rope, but cannot be thrown to the ground by the rope. If the calf falls, the roper loses seconds because he must allow the calf to get back on its feet. When the roper reaches the calf, he picks it up and flips it onto its side. Once the calf is on the ground, the roper ties three of the calf's legs together with a short rope known as a "piggin' string". The horse is trained to assist the roper by slowly backing away from the calf to maintain a steady tension on the rope.

When the tie is complete, the roper throws his hands in the air to signal "time" and stop the clock.

Meet the 2020 Fair & Rodeo Court

Rodeo court

The 2020 Court competed for the royal title on October 26, 2019. Five young women were challenged in categories such as rodeo knowledge, appearance, poise, speech presentation, and horsemanship skills. Join us on March 7, 2020, for the Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court Coronation in the Main Pavilion at the Clackamas County Event Center (Fairgrounds). If you are interested in helping out by becoming a sponsor or donating an auction item you can look for details on the Canby Rodeo website, the Clackamas County Fair website, the Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court Facebook page, or ask any of the Court Members.

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Nicole Aydt was born and raised in Astoria, Oregon to parents Cathy and Brian Aydt. She attended Astoria High School and graduated as the Salutatorian of her class in 2013. During High School she was involved in volleyball, Business Leaders of Tomorrow, National Honor Society, and was a 5-time competitor on the Clatsop County State Equestrian Team. For 8 years she participated in Horse 4-H where she learned public speaking, various horsemanship skills, and held club offices. Nicole attended Seattle University for one year, received her Associates Degree from Clatsop Community College, and went on to attend Oregon State University where she not only received her Bachelor of Science, but went on to achieve a Master of Science in Kinesiology with a focus on Physical Education. While attending OSU, she was involved with the Oregon State Intercollegiate Horse Show Association and a member of the Agricultural Sorority, Sigma Alpha. At just 25 years of age, Nicole has entered her second year of teaching with the Hillsboro School District as an Elementary Physical Education teacher at North Plains Elementary. She also coaches a volleyball team at Catlin Gabel School. On her very limited days off Nicole enjoys being outside kayaking, hiking, riding horses, spending time with friends and family, and of course, attending rodeos. When asked why she wanted to be a part of the Clackamas County Fair & Canby Rodeo Court, she said: “My goal with representing the Canby Rodeo is to create a positive image of rodeo throughout the state. Education of our sport and events is important to creating growth and encouraging more people to want to participate and spectate. It is important that while we continue to educate adults, that we create an atmosphere for children to dream. By creating a platform of encouragement and education, I believe we can create a community full of future dreamers to carry on our sport.

27036

Marlee James is the 19 year old daughter of Robert and Launa James out of Gaston, Oregon. She has been riding horses since she was 4 years old and when she entered 4th grade she did what many young girls do and joined Horse 4-H. She participated and competed for 9 years and has volunteered as an adult for 2 years. Marlee achieved the Dad Potter 3-step Award, which is no small feat in the world of Horse 4-H. She is currently the adult representative of the Washington County 4-H Horse Junior Advisory Board. While attending Forest Grove High School, Marlee joined the Equestrian Team and competed in many events. She was named the Senior Team Contributor for the NW District Oregon High School Equestrian Team. Her love of horses carries over into her free time as she spends time training youth, training horses, and continuing to help with Horse 4-H and OHSET. Marlee currently works at Companion Animal Hospital. She has been a devoted employee for the past 7 years. She is taking courses through Penn Foster to become a Certified Veterinary Technician. She hopes to work at a practice that cares for both large and small animals. Marlee’s passion for rodeo has grown over the last couple of years and she is eager to represent the sport and its incredible history. In response to the question of why she wants to be part of the 2020 Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court, Marlee had this to say: “I want to promote and represent the Canby Rodeo and Clackamas County Fair because they truly represent what it means to bring a community together to put on a show that teaches people about its history and how it’s more than just an event, it’s a way of life.”

27036

Alexa Wacker resides in Beavercreek, Oregon and is the 19 year old daughter of Kevin and Angela Wacker. Before she could walk she was riding horses and within a short time was competing in various equestrian events winning awards at just 3 years old. Alexa competed on the Oregon City High School Equestrian Team all 4 years of HS and was the team captain for her last two years. She achieved multiple awards at both the District and State level and is a record holder for Canadian Flags and Keyhole. She also participated in the Clackamas County 4-H program for 9 years showing horses and swine. She qualified for State competition six years in a row. Alexa plans on becoming an OHSET coach and 4-H leader so she can give back to the organizations that helped her become the woman she is today. Currently, Alexa works at Molalla Manor Care Center which ties in to her schooling. She is a sophomore pursuing a degree in Nursing from Concordia University. If she has any free time, Alexa can be found helping out at her family’s boarding and training facility. When asked why she wants to be part of the 2020 Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court, Alexa said: “Ever since I was a little girls, I’ve seen the Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court as three amazing role models, and ideal horse women. They represent hard work, dedication and the great sport of rodeo. I want to be a part of the CCF & CRC because I want to do all I can to help ensure the longevity of rodeo and the western lifestyle. As a part of the court, my goals would include being a positive role model and a strong advocate for the sport of rodeo and western way of life so that it may continue to thrive for generations to come.”

27036

The sport of rodeo today arose out of the real life working practices of cattle ranching families in Spain, Mexico, and later in the United States, Canada, South America and Australia.

Early rodeo-like affairs of the 1820's and 1830's were informal events in the western United States and northern Mexico with cowboys and Vaqueros testing their work skills against one another.

Following the American Civil War, early rodeo competitions emerged with the first being held in Cheyenne, Wyoming in 1872, but Prescott, Arizona claims the distinction of holding the first professional rodeo when it charged admission and awarded trophies in 1888. Between 1890 and 1910, rodeo became a public entertainment, sometimes combining Wild West Shows featuring individuals such as Buffalo Bill Cody, Annie Oakley, and other charismatic stars. By 1910, several major rodeos were established in

Rodeo Today

Rodeo

The sport of rodeo today offers spectators a window into America's rich rural ranching past, with all the excitement and electricity that today's major modern sporting events have to offer! Rodeo goes with America like apple pie and baseball. Rodeo exemplifies grit and determination - the spirit of American ideals.

Standardized events are designed to test the skill and speed of the human cowboy and cowgirl athletes who participate.

Professional rodeos generally comprises the following events: tie-down roping, team roping, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, bull riding, and barrel racing.

Events are divided into two basic categories: the rough stock events and the timed events. Depending on sanctioning organization and region, other events such as breakaway roping, goat tying, and pole bending may also be a part of some rodeos.

27001

The Canby Rodeo, presented by the Clackamas County Fair, is held traditionally the 3rd week in August.  The first sanctioned rodeo in Canby was held in 1958 and was called the "Clackamas County Fair Rodeo".  The rodeo was held on the heels of a very poorly attended Fair the previous year.  The Fair reported that "Fair attendance was down, gate receipts were down, and exhibitor participation was down".

The Fair Board realized that only a dramatic economic change could solve the problem.  The Fair Board sought out the help of Canby resident Craig Landeen, a promotor of rodeo.  Landeen and his wife Marilyn were involved in many facets of rodeo throughout the Northwest, from participation to management.

Craig Landeen was asked for advice concerning possibilities of a rodeo as an attraction to boost attendance to the Fair.  With the blessing and prompting of the Fair Board, Landeen developed a list of prospective stock contractors, costs, risks, publicity possibilities, rodeo format, and extra events.  Landeen then stunned the Fair Board by proposing to squeeze "four hours of rodeo excitement in only two hours"!  The Fair Board liked the proposal!

Today, over 50 years later, spectators are still treated to the tradition "four hours of rodeo excitement in only two hours".  This innovative idea makes Canby Rodeo one of the best rodeos to watch in the Northwest!

Always striving to make a better rodeo, the Canby Rodeo has recently implemented "Same day slack and same day performance". Same day slack and same day performance simply means that timed event competitors will receive both of his or her opportunities or "go-rounds" to compete on the same day of the rodeo. Making it more economical for the cowboy/cowgirl and more enjoyable for the fan!

County fair in 1915
County Fair in 1915

 

27001

Rodeo Court Sponsors

The History of Rodeo

Historical photo of rodeo

27001

Nicole Aydt was born and raised in Astoria, Oregon to parents Cathy and Brian Aydt. She attended Astoria High School and graduated as the Salutatorian of her class in 2013. During High School she was involved in volleyball, Business Leaders of Tomorrow, National Honor Society, and was a 5-time competitor on the Clatsop County State Equestrian Team. For 8 years she participated in Horse 4-H where she learned public speaking, various horsemanship skills, and held club offices. Nicole attended Seattle University for one year, received her Associates Degree from Clatsop Community College, and went on to attend Oregon State University where she not only received her Bachelor of Science, but went on to achieve a Master of Science in Kinesiology with a focus on Physical Education. While attending OSU, she was involved with the Oregon State Intercollegiate Horse Show Association and a member of the Agricultural Sorority, Sigma Alpha. At just 25 years of age, Nicole has entered her second year of teaching with the Hillsboro School District as an Elementary Physical Education teacher at North Plains Elementary. She also coaches a volleyball team at Catlin Gabel School. On her very limited days off Nicole enjoys being outside kayaking, hiking, riding horses, spending time with friends and family, and of course, attending rodeos. When asked why she wanted to be a part of the Clackamas County Fair & Canby Rodeo Court, she said: “My goal with representing the Canby Rodeo is to create a positive image of rodeo throughout the state. Education of our sport and events is important to creating growth and encouraging more people to want to participate and spectate. It is important that while we continue to educate adults, that we create an atmosphere for children to dream. By creating a platform of encouragement and education, I believe we can create a community full of future dreamers to carry on our sport.

27036

Marlee James is the 19 year old daughter of Robert and Launa James out of Gaston, Oregon. She has been riding horses since she was 4 years old and when she entered 4th grade she did what many young girls do and joined Horse 4-H. She participated and competed for 9 years and has volunteered as an adult for 2 years. Marlee achieved the Dad Potter 3-step Award, which is no small feat in the world of Horse 4-H. She is currently the adult representative of the Washington County 4-H Horse Junior Advisory Board. While attending Forest Grove High School, Marlee joined the Equestrian Team and competed in many events. She was named the Senior Team Contributor for the NW District Oregon High School Equestrian Team. Her love of horses carries over into her free time as she spends time training youth, training horses, and continuing to help with Horse 4-H and OHSET. Marlee currently works at Companion Animal Hospital. She has been a devoted employee for the past 7 years. She is taking courses through Penn Foster to become a Certified Veterinary Technician. She hopes to work at a practice that cares for both large and small animals. Marlee’s passion for rodeo has grown over the last couple of years and she is eager to represent the sport and its incredible history. In response to the question of why she wants to be part of the 2020 Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court, Marlee had this to say: “I want to promote and represent the Canby Rodeo and Clackamas County Fair because they truly represent what it means to bring a community together to put on a show that teaches people about its history and how it’s more than just an event, it’s a way of life.”

27036

Alexa Wacker resides in Beavercreek, Oregon and is the 19 year old daughter of Kevin and Angela Wacker. Before she could walk she was riding horses and within a short time was competing in various equestrian events winning awards at just 3 years old. Alexa competed on the Oregon City High School Equestrian Team all 4 years of HS and was the team captain for her last two years. She achieved multiple awards at both the District and State level and is a record holder for Canadian Flags and Keyhole. She also participated in the Clackamas County 4-H program for 9 years showing horses and swine. She qualified for State competition six years in a row. Alexa plans on becoming an OHSET coach and 4-H leader so she can give back to the organizations that helped her become the woman she is today. Currently, Alexa works at Molalla Manor Care Center which ties in to her schooling. She is a sophomore pursuing a degree in Nursing from Concordia University. If she has any free time, Alexa can be found helping out at her family’s boarding and training facility. When asked why she wants to be part of the 2020 Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court, Alexa said: “Ever since I was a little girls, I’ve seen the Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo Court as three amazing role models, and ideal horse women. They represent hard work, dedication and the great sport of rodeo. I want to be a part of the CCF & CRC because I want to do all I can to help ensure the longevity of rodeo and the western lifestyle. As a part of the court, my goals would include being a positive role model and a strong advocate for the sport of rodeo and western way of life so that it may continue to thrive for generations to come.”

27036

The sport of rodeo today arose out of the real life working practices of cattle ranching families in Spain, Mexico, and later in the United States, Canada, South America and Australia.

Early rodeo-like affairs of the 1820's and 1830's were informal events in the western United States and northern Mexico with cowboys and Vaqueros testing their work skills against one another.

Following the American Civil War, early rodeo competitions emerged with the first being held in Cheyenne, Wyoming in 1872, but Prescott, Arizona claims the distinction of holding the first professional rodeo when it charged admission and awarded trophies in 1888. Between 1890 and 1910, rodeo became a public entertainment, sometimes combining Wild West Shows featuring individuals such as Buffalo Bill Cody, Annie Oakley, and other charismatic stars. By 1910, several major rodeos were established in

Rodeo Today

Rodeo

The sport of rodeo today offers spectators a window into America's rich rural ranching past, with all the excitement and electricity that today's major modern sporting events have to offer! Rodeo goes with America like apple pie and baseball. Rodeo exemplifies grit and determination - the spirit of American ideals.

Standardized events are designed to test the skill and speed of the human cowboy and cowgirl athletes who participate.

Professional rodeos generally comprises the following events: tie-down roping, team roping, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, bull riding, and barrel racing.

Events are divided into two basic categories: the rough stock events and the timed events. Depending on sanctioning organization and region, other events such as breakaway roping, goat tying, and pole bending may also be a part of some rodeos.

27001

The Canby Rodeo, presented by the Clackamas County Fair, is held traditionally the 3rd week in August.  The first sanctioned rodeo in Canby was held in 1958 and was called the "Clackamas County Fair Rodeo".  The rodeo was held on the heels of a very poorly attended Fair the previous year.  The Fair reported that "Fair attendance was down, gate receipts were down, and exhibitor participation was down".

The Fair Board realized that only a dramatic economic change could solve the problem.  The Fair Board sought out the help of Canby resident Craig Landeen, a promotor of rodeo.  Landeen and his wife Marilyn were involved in many facets of rodeo throughout the Northwest, from participation to management.

Craig Landeen was asked for advice concerning possibilities of a rodeo as an attraction to boost attendance to the Fair.  With the blessing and prompting of the Fair Board, Landeen developed a list of prospective stock contractors, costs, risks, publicity possibilities, rodeo format, and extra events.  Landeen then stunned the Fair Board by proposing to squeeze "four hours of rodeo excitement in only two hours"!  The Fair Board liked the proposal!

Today, over 50 years later, spectators are still treated to the tradition "four hours of rodeo excitement in only two hours".  This innovative idea makes Canby Rodeo one of the best rodeos to watch in the Northwest!

Always striving to make a better rodeo, the Canby Rodeo has recently implemented "Same day slack and same day performance". Same day slack and same day performance simply means that timed event competitors will receive both of his or her opportunities or "go-rounds" to compete on the same day of the rodeo. Making it more economical for the cowboy/cowgirl and more enjoyable for the fan!

County fair in 1915
County Fair in 1915

 

27001

Get Involved

Are you interested in volunteering with the Canby Rodeo?  Or would you like to apply to be a Rodeo Associate?  Send us an email at rhodescj@canby.com to request more information!