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Juvenile Department

Juvenile Department

Frequently Asked Questions

For more information or any further questions, please contact us at 503-655-8342.

If you have an after hours issue requiring immediate assistance, you can call the Clackamas County Juvenile Intake and Assessment Center. A juvenile counselor is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week and can provide information and referral services. The phone number for the Intake and Assessment Center is 503-650-3180.

For Parents/Guardians

30666

For Victims

30726

About the Law

30701
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Guidelines for Youth Tutor

This is a learning opportunity to develop an understanding of the duties and responsibilities for assisting youth in their learning process. You will be working with youth who can benefit from educational guidance and additional instruction to pass a GED exam, catch up with past school work, or prepare for various academic requirements.

Learning objectives

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of supervising youth in an educational setting.
  • Learn philosophical perspectives endorsed and implemented by the Juvenile Department, such as Best Practices and Restorative Justice.
  • Assist youth in completing a project and keeping youth motivated.

Expectations

  • Ability to explain math, science or literature concepts to a varying range of youth. From those who do not know their multiplication tables to others almost ready to pass a GED exam on algebra. With math, tutors must specifically be able to explain algebraic and geometric concepts.
  • Ability to teach test taking strategies to help kids pass an exam.
  • A second adult being present and listening to youth can be useful if youth discloses something that needs to be followed up on.

Technical

  • You must be 21 years of age.
  • Schedules are set a few weeks prior to beginning the program and can change on short notice.
  • Attendance at all in house trainings are required. These include: RJ, CCJD overview, working with Youth in the Community. CPI if offered during internship time frame.
  • Additional opportunities to compliment your experience working with at risk youth are: Court observations, Intake and Assessment (IAC) observation, , Informational Interviews, observation of Drug Court, observing cognitive skills group—all will be scheduled by volunteer coordinator
  • Hours of volunteering will be reported to Volunteer Coordinator or the supervising CCJD staff monthly.

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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Guidelines for Theatre for Change

This is a learning opportunity for you to develop an understanding of the duties and responsibilities for supervising youth in a creative process. You will be working collaboratively with professionals and youth who will participate in a play they will write themselves, from their own experiences.

Learning Objectives

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of supervising youth in a creative setting.
  • Understand concepts of confidentiality and providing a safe space for youth to be vulnerable with their experiences. Stories shared in this setting will be held with the highest level of privacy and respect. Learning how to manage this element is paramount to the success of youth development.
  • Learn philosophical perspectives endorsed and implemented by the Juvenile Department, such as Best Practices and Restorative Justice.
  • Observe and assist in the facilitation of completing a project and keeping youth motivated.

Technical

  • Schedules are set a few weeks prior to beginning the program. Attendance to all rehearsals is important for the success of the kids. This is especially relevant on performance night.
  • One intern can split their time between two or more programs. And doing so is advised for a better learning experience.
  • Attendance at all in house trainings are required before internship is complete but need not be completed before the end of Theatre for Change. RJ, CCJD overview, Working with Youth in the Community. CPI if offered during internship time frame.
  • Additional opportunities to compliment your experience working with at risk youth are: Court observations, Intake and Assessment (IAC) observation, , Informational Interviews, observation of Drug Court, observing cognitive skills group—all will be scheduled by volunteer coordinator
  • Hours of internship will be reported to Volunteer Coordinator monthly for each program/project you are working with.
  • A second adult being present and listening to youth can be useful if youth discloses something that needs to be followed up on.

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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Guidelines when Supporting Skills Groups

The key support is being another positive adult who is taking the time to be fully present with youth in the group.

There are two types of ways to be supportive in a group. There are technical ways and compassionate ways you are supportive during the group experience. The following are some examples of each.

Learning Objectives and Corresponding Skill Sets

  • Promote the use of restorative justice in the juvenile justice system, in schools, in the workplace and elsewhere in the community to bring awareness to the effectiveness of this systematic approach
  • Gain skills to build rapport with youth and practice these skills
  • Develop skills to lead the work of youth and practice redirecting youth back to the assigned project
  • Have knowledge of program expectations and assist in holding youth accountable

Technical Support

  • Being a second person in the group increases safety by insuring that all youth are attended to. For example…
    • One adult stepping to the side or in the hallway to check in with one group member individually leaves the other adult present with the group.
    • Walking some youth between the lobby and the meeting space while other youth remain in the meeting room doing paperwork. Both groups have an adult with them.
    • If the facilitator forgot to get something from a different building such as a snack or art project item, they might send you to get this item so they can stay present with the group.
  • A second person being present and listening to the youth can be useful if a youth discloses something that needs to be followed up on.
  • Arriving early (15 minutes minimum) to a group and helping the lead facilitator set up is always welcome. The lead facilitator and you can set a final plan if an earlier arrival is necessary (each group has a different set up time).

Other important aspects to be aware of as you start your experience in Skills Groups

  • Appropriate self disclosure
    Often in groups, all members—including facilitators—answer questions that come up during the group. It is not expected that the adults in the group share personally sensitive topics or something that they themselves have not dealt with. 
  • Recognize your reason to choose to share something
    Sometimes people share information to join with a youth. Sometimes this sort of sharing can remove the attention from the youth. A good question to ask yourself whenever you feel a strong pull to share something is: “Am I sharing this for me or am I sharing this because it will benefit the youth?” Pausing and asking that simple question can help people new to the group experience have balance regarding when it is appropriate to share something. If you are uncertain, then this would be a good topic to bring to the lead facilitator during the debrief to get their perspective.

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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Project Payback

This is a learning opportunity for you to develop an understanding of the duties and responsibilities for supervising youth on a work crew. Youth are earning money to pay restitution to victims and court fees/fines. Crews are an excellent venue to develop leadership skills.

Learning objectives

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of supervising youth in a work setting.
  • Learn philosophical perspectives endorsed and implemented by the Juvenile Department, such as Best Practices and Restorative Justice.
  • Observe and assist in the facilitation of completing a project and keeping youth motivated to complete daily work tasks.

Logistics

  • Shifts begin at 10 a.m. and will return at 4:15 p.m. Pick up and drop off location is at the Annex building, 2106 Kaen Road.
  • Crew runs on Saturday and Sunday rain or shine, but may be cancelled in the event of ice or snow. Call Wayne to be certain.
  • Crews are conducted outside and consist of hard physical labor.
  • Water is provided, but you will need to bring your own lunch.
  • Clothing
    • Dress appropriately for the weather.
    • Expect to get dirty.
    • No revealing clothing, logos promoting alcohol, tobacco or drugs are allowed.
    • No cut-offs.
    • No open toe shoes.

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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Guidelines for Restorative Justice Intern

This is a learning opportunity for you to develop an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of a Victim-Offender Dialogue (VOD) coordinator/facilitator, who works directly with victims of property related crimes and youth offenders towards meaningfully repairing the harm.

Learning objectives

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of:
    • Basic case management techniques while working to coordinate VODs at CDRS.
    • The life of a VOD case, from the time victim contact is initiated through VIP, to the eventual closing of a VOD case after a dialogue.
    • Resources and services available to victims through VIP.
    • The court process and necessary VIP and VOD documents.
    • Empathic listening skills through VIP/VOD programs and respond effectively to victims needs.
    • Evidence-based practices and program evaluation through VIP/VOD data collection and data entry.
  • Learn philosophical perspectives endorsed and implemented by the Juvenile Department, such as best practices and Restorative Justice.
  • Observe, co-facilitate, and facilitate VODs, and provide in-depth assessment and preparation for crime victims and offenders in order to determine whether a VOD will effectively meet the needs of all parties.

Technical

  • You must be 21 years of age and in your last year of a 4-year degree program, or a graduate student. Any experience in this field is preferred.
  • Schedule will vary but will be agreed upon between supervising Restorative Justice Coordinator (RJC) and intern.
  • Your RJC task supervisor will complete evaluations on your participation both for CCJD and your university.
  • The minimum length of commitment is 200 hours. An extended experience is available with proven success. Intern will complete Exit Evaluation at end of internship.
  • One intern can split their time between the Juvenile Department (Victim Impact Program) and Clackamas County Dispute Resolution Services (CDRS).
  • Attendance at all in house trainings are required before internship is complete. RJ, VOD, CCJD overview, Working with Youth in the Community. CPI if offered during internship time frame. Additional trainings may be required.
  • Opportunities provided : Victim-offender Dialogue (VOD) observation/co facilitation opportunities, VOD case management, Victim Impact Program (VIP) phone support, accompaniment in court as support for victims, Court observations, Intake and Assessment (IAC) observation – to be schedule by Volunteer Coordinator, Informational Interviews with JCII’s, observation of Drug Court, home and school visits (for VOD meetings), observing one skills group – scheduled by Volunteer Coordinator, attend a CCJD staff meeting, observe Restorative Justice Coalition (RJCO) Committee meeting, Coffee Talk informational presentations, and additional training opportunities through CDRS (conflict management, mediation, etc.).
  • Hours of internship will be reported to Volunteer Coordinator monthly.
  • Intern hours at CDRS are to be documented in their system.
  • One hour of supervision a week required with MSW or (university approved equivalent, i.e., LPC) supervisor.

Guidelines

  • Be an active listener to victims, youth, families, community members, and colleagues.
  • Value and respond to the individual and specific interests of the crime victims we serve.
  • Encourage victims’ voice and participation in determining how to meaningfully address and repair that harm.
  • Use empathy when speaking with victims, youth, families, and community members.
  • Use the Informational Questions and forms from orientation to learn more about the varying roles of individuals working at CCJD.

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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Guidelines for Juvenile Counselor Intern

This is a learning opportunity for you to develop an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of a juvenile probation/juvenile counselor (JC). Your tenure here will expose you to as many facets of this profession as we are able.

**This is a competitive internship. CCJD accepts 2 JC interns per term. Must be a senior in a 4 year degree program and commit to 3-6 months. Longer opportunities can be created. Individual opportunities combine probation and program supervision to create unique work experience options.

Learning objectives

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of:
    • Basic case management techniques while working under the supervision of a JC.
    • The life of a case, from the time a police report is received from law enforcement to the eventual closing of a case.
    • Specialized caseloads relative to youth referred for law violations, gang activity, drug and alcohol abuse, and sex offenses for example.
    • The court process and necessary documents.
    • Effective interventions and community based resources.
    • Residential and closed custody options & rules governing those resources.
  • Learn philosophical perspectives endorsed and implemented by the Juvenile Department, such as Best Practices and Restorative Justice.
  • Observe and assist in the facilitation of a skill building group under the supervision of a skilled group facilitator.

Technical

  • You must be 21 years of age and in your last year of a 4-year degree program.
  • Schedules will vary, but will be agreed upon between supervising JCII and intern.
  • Your supervising counselor will complete evaluations regarding your participation, both for CCJD and your university.
  • The minimum length of commitment is 200 hours. An extended experience is available with proven success. Intern will complete Exit Evaluation at end of internship.
  • One intern can split their time between two JCIIs, if appropriate for their experience and if JCIIs are available.
  • Attendance at all in-house trainings are required before your internship is complete. These training may include: Restorative Justice, CCJD overview, Working with Youth in the Community and Crisis Prevention and Intervention if offered during internship time frame.
  • Additional opportunities maybe provided, such as: Court observations, Juvenile Intake and Assessment (JIAC observation—to be schedule by Volunteer Coordinator), ride along with other counselors, Informational Interviews with other counselors, observation of Drug Court, home and school visits, observation of an intake interview or youth check-ins, completion of a reformation plan, observing one skills group (scheduled by volunteer coordinator), attend a CCJD staff meeting, and observe completion of a shelter or residential referral.
  • Hours of internship will be reported to supervising counselor or Volunteer Coordinator monthly

Guidelines

  • Dress professionally and appropriate for your shifts at CCJD. Follow the standard of your supervising counselor: Dress pants, conservative shirts/tops, closed toes shoes. No jeans.
  • Use the Informational Questions and forms from orientation to learn more about the JCII role.

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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Guidelines for Infiniworks

This is a learning opportunity for you to develop an understanding of the duties and responsibilities for supervising young (under age 12) youth on a work crew. They are earning money to repay victims and restitution, while participating in a positive environment and learning new skills.

Learning Objectives

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of supervising the youngest youth we serve.
  • Learn philosophical perspectives endorsed and implemented by the Juvenile Department, such as Best Practices and Restorative Justice.
  • Observe and assist in the facilitation of completing a project and keeping youth motivated to repair harm.

Technical

  • Shifts are every other Saturday 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., rain or shine. Arrive 15 minutes early.
  • One intern can split their time between two or more programs. Doing so is advised for a better learning experience.
  • Attendance at all in-house trainings are required before your internship is complete. Trainings may include: Restorative Justice, CCJD overview, Working with Youth in the Community, and CPI if offered during internship time frame.
  • Additional opportunities to compliment your experience are: Court observations, Intake and Assessment (IAC) observation, informational interviews, observation of Drug Court, and observing one skills group. All will be scheduled by volunteer coordinator.
  • Hours of internship will be reported to Volunteer Coordinator monthly.
  • Trust your supervisor. They follow procedures for a purpose. Use each scenario and phone call as an opportunity to inquire about our processes and become more informed of department practices.
  • A second adult being present and listening to youth can be useful if youth discloses something that needs further attention.

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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Guidelines for Community Connections

Community Connections, in collaboration with community partners, provides meaningful projects for youth offenders to develop their work and social competencies while giving back to the communities harmed by their actions. Interns and volunteers working in this program will participate in two site experiences each month and facilitate the coordination of the program in an administrative role.

Learning Objectives

  • Promote the use of restorative justice in the juvenile justice system in schools, in the workplace, and elsewhere in the community in situations where conflict may arise.
  • Assist in the reintegration of juvenile youth and to provide offenders the opportunity to repair the harm to the victim and community.
  • Understand the service provided, logistics, and best practices of Community Connections partnerships.
  • Identify barriers of CCJD youth and apply knowledge of resources to youth and family to overcome these barriers and strengthen their confidence in being successful.
  • Define basic Juvenile Justice language and terms used in the criminal justice context.
  • Describe procedures in operational systems used to schedule youth, notify partners, and communicate with Juvenile Court Counselors to better accomplish goals of Community Connections.
  • Have knowledge of and clarify expectations to youth/families when scheduling community service.
  • Effectively discuss the goals of Community Service and implement policies and procedures.
  • Identify confidentiality policies and apply these policies in all

Goals of Program

  • Apply restorative justice principles and practices
  • Provide youth with a positive, successful community experience that will foster the development of new skills
  • Be supportive and patient with youth, parents, and partners
  • Holding youth accountable in a meaningful way
  • Assisting youth with the development of new skills
  • Strengthen youth attachment to their community
    • Encounter a conflict of interest
    • Are notified of a conflict/incident involving a youth and/or partner
    • Experience technical difficulties with programs, data bases or equipment used to complete assigned duties

Expectations

  • Arrive on time
  • Call ahead if you cannot make it or will be late
  • Follow daily duty checklist
  • Call back youth and sign up for community service projects
  • Keep work station organized (shared work station)
  • Complete training modules
  • Ask for assistance when you feel stuck (It’s better to ask than to guess)
  • Document and log information that will need to be addressed by CC Program Aide or Coordinator
  • Follow procedures when you are in need of a JJIS number

Technical

  • Any information that you have access to regarding youth is covered by State and County confidentiality policies (remember the confidentiality agreement you signed and ask if you have any questions)
  • Know where all emergency equipment is located in the Annex (first aid kit, fire extinguisher, doors you can exit, AED)

Read more about the application process and guidelines.

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