Surface Water Management

Watershed Health | Annual Private Property Stormwater System Inspection and Reporting | MS4 Permits | TMDL Documents | Resources

Surface Water Management provides water quality protection for the community by implementing programs to reduce pollution in our rivers, streams and wetlands caused by urban stormwater runoff.

Stormwater runoff is the most significant source of water pollution in our state. It washes pollutants into storm drains and drainage ditches, carrying silt, oil, chemicals, trash and pesticides to the nearest creek, stream or wetland. The polluted runoff can harm fish, aquatic life, and threaten our drinking water.

Through watershed protection and planning, Water Environment Services is taking a long-term approach to protecting the health of our water resources.

What does the Surface Water Management Program do?

  • Maintains stormwater facilities, which capture and filter runoff
  • Monitors water quality
  • Ensures buffer zones between new development and wetland/creek areas
  • Plans and designs regional water quality and flood reduction projects
  • Provides long-term watershed planning
  • Provides public outreach and partnerships for pollution prevention

Why do I pay a Surface Water Management Fee?

Each resident of the community contributes to the cost of the program because we all use the buildings, streets, parking lots and sidewalks that contribute to the need for a surface water management program. Developers also pay for the cost of building the drainage systems and water quality facilities serving their development.

Watershed Health

Annual Private Property Stormwater System Inspection and Reporting

What is a private stormwater system?
Private stormwater systems collect, treat and convey stormwater from private property to local waterways or groundwater. Most often these are connected to the public system in the street. These private structures may include storm drains, underground tanks, vaults, manholes, oil/water separators, detention/water quality ponds & swales, etc. The stormwater system in the public street is not the responsibility of the adjacent property owner.

Why clean your storm system?
Per Section 12.10 of the Water Environment Services (WES) Rules and Regulations, properties with private stormwater collection and treatment devices must annually inspect, maintain, clean (as needed) and report on this activity to WES. As the property owner, you are responsible for maintaining and cleaning your privately owned storm drains to keep the dirt, debris and pollution from roofs, parking lots and vehicles from entering the public stormwater system. 

Keeping your business’s drains clean may also lower your risk of property damage caused by flooding. Standing water may also seep into asphalt cracks causing a premature failure of the parking area.

Businesses can take advantage of our discounted Storm Drain Cleaning Assistance Program.

The deadline for reduced rate for the Fall 2019 campaign has passed. Please check back in the Spring (March/April) or the Fall (September/October) for the next Stormdrain Cleaning Assistance Program opportunity.

How do I know my stormwater system needs cleaning?
Stormwater structures such as storm drains, underground tanks, vaults, manholes, oil/water separators, etc., need cleaning when the sediment/debris accumulation inhibits proper treatment and conveyance. 

Vegetated stormwater facilities such detention/water quality ponds & swales, need cleaning when the sediment/debris accumulation reaches a specific level or when vegetation needs maintenance.

Stormwater system maintenance and cleaning criteria

Annual Reporting
Use our online reporting tool
Before December 31st of each year, please send WES an annual report on inspection and any maintenance or cleaning performed on your system. Use the online reporting tool or mail your annual 2018 stormwater system report information to: Water Environment Services - Attn: John Nagy, 150 Beavercreek Rd # 430, Oregon City, OR, 97045.

Storm Drain Cleaning Assistance Program (SCAP)

The deadline for reduced rate for the Fall 2019 campaign has passed. Please check back in the Spring (March/April) or the Fall (September/October) for the next Stormdrain Cleaning Assistance Program opportunity.

More Information
For questions about participating or assistance regarding the maintenance of private drainage systems, contact:
wes.stormdrain@clackamas.us 
 

Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) Permit

MS4 Permit Renewal Application Package

MS4 Permit Stormwater Management Plans

MS4 Permit Annual Reports

Clackamas County Service District No. 1 and Surface Water Management Agency of Clackamas County

Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Documents

Resources