Drive to Zero Transportation Safety Action Plan Update, 2017-18

Working together to eliminate fatal and serious injury crashes on all roads in Clackamas County by 2035

Upcoming Events Meetings Documents Drive to Zero 2012 TSAP

Drive to Zero Transportation Safety Action Plan

Transportation safety is a top priority in Clackamas County. That's why we're updating our Transportation Safety Action Plan (TSAP). We need your help to update the plan and, even more importantly, to make our roads safe for all travelers.

Get involved

  • Be a safe driver
  • Let us know about safety problems you see on our roads online, by sending an email to roadconcerns@clackamas.us or calling 503-557-6391
  • Send us your ideas about how to reduce crashes or specific locations (e.g., an intersection) where you think we could do something to improve safety for motorists, bicyclists and/or pedestrians at drivetozero@clackamas.us
  • Attend DTZ TSAP Update advisory committee meetings
  • Attend Traffic Safety Commission meetings

Our goal is to get to zero fatal and serious injury crashes by 2035.

The updated TSAP will help us meet that goal by providing information about key crash causes and factors including the roadway, the vehicle operator and the vehicle itself. Analyzing this data will provide valuable information to help the County develop strategies that will improve transportation system safety for all travelers - motorists, transit-users, bicyclists and pedestrians.

 

For more information, email us at drivetozero@clackamas.us.

Upcoming events

Traffic Safety Commission meetingsDrive to Zero TSAP Updated Public Advisory Committee meetings

  • To be scheduled

Meetings

Nov. 20, 2017
Joint Meeting of DTZ TSAP Updated Technical and Public Advisory Committees

July 18, 2017
Board of Commissioners Policy Session

Documents

2012 Transportation Safety Action Plan (TSAP) Overview

Each year in the United States, nearly 40,000 people are killed in transportation crashes. Internationally, the high rate of fatalities caused the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare traffic crashes as an international health crisis in 2010.

Clackamas County's 2012 TSAP outlined 10-year strategies for reducing fatal and serious injury crashes and implementing a county-wide safety culture, with a plan update in five years.

As the first-of-its-kind TSAP in the state, our plan broke new ground by applying a holistic approach to transportation safety with strategies to that include everyone in the community - not just traffic engineers and law enforcement personnel.

The plan also focuses on crash factors and causes rather than crash locations. Data shows that over 99 percent of crashes have a human error component sometimes combined with other factors like the roadway and the vehicle. With the location of the crash being largely random, predicting where a crash will occur is difficult, but predicting crash causes and key factors is easier because they tend to remain relatively constant.

From the safety data analysis, the 2012 TSAP identified these top three areas of concern:

  • Aggressive driving (such as driving over the speed limit, following too close, driving too fast for conditions)
  • Young drivers (ages 15-25)
  • Roadway departures (e.g., a vehicle leaving the lane in which is it intended to travel)

Since 2012, the county has taken many steps toward accomplishing the TSAP goals, including:

  • Encouraging all County departments to work together to incorporate transportation safety into all their work
  • Realigning budgets and goals around transportation safety, including adding safety-related-performance measures to the county's strategic plan
  • Developing videos, public service announcements, billboards and other educational outreach
  • Increasing engineering efforts related to safety, including:
    • More pro-active safety work on county roads
    • Increased safety advocacy with cities and other transportation agencies in the county
    • Increased use of Road Safety Audits (pro-active road safety assessments and solutions)
  • Creating a strong and collaborative safety education outreach program, including:
    • Implementing Drive to Zero branding
    • Sponsoring a bi-annual Posters & Coasters contest for students in Clackamas County high schools to create media that promotes safe driving habits for their peers and the community as a whole
    • Running Safety Street at the annual County Fair - an area dedicated to all things safety including roadways, water safety, 911 and enforcement
    • Providing safety education for area high school students and community members
    • Sponsoring car-seat inspection and distribution programs
  • Increasing our work with law enforcement partners, including:
    • Ensuring business owners comply with restrictions on alcohol sales to minors
    • Partnering on patrols in school and work zones

Five years later, much has changed both nationally and locally related to safety.

  • On the national level, there are two strong initiatives, including Toward Zero Deaths and Road to Zero.
  • Oregon, a state that has had a TSAP in place for many years, updated its plan in 2017 with a vision of "No deaths or life-changing injuries on Oregon's transportation system by 2035."
  • There has been new research on transportation safety, culture, transportation and health, and many traffic safety plans adopted by government agencies at the county, state, national and even international level.